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Full text of "Announcement of the College of Medicine, the State University of Iowa"

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~ BULLETIN OF THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 

> " New Series No. 147 April. 1907 



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THE 



H State University of Iowa 



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IOWA CITY 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



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Published by the University 

Iowa City, Iowa 

1907 

^Tv THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY ARE 

2^ ISSUED EVERY SIX WEEKS, DURING THE ACADEMIC YEAR, AT LEAST 

^ SIX NUMBERS EVERY CALENDAR YEAR. ENTERED AT THE POST OFFICE 

^ AS SECOND CLASS MAIL MATTER. 



^ 




Old Capitol Building 

Ball of Liberal Arts 

Engineering Shops 

Mining Engineering Laboratory 

Hall of Electrical Engineering 

Carpenter Shop 

Ball of Physics 

Ball of Dentistry 

Ball of Natural Sciences 

New Ball of Natural Sciences 

School of Music (affiliated) 

Ball of Anatomy 

neral Medical Laboratories 
Close Ball (Women's Gymnasium) 33. 
Ball of Chemistry and Pharmacy 34. 
Bomeopathic Bospital 36. 

University Bospital 37. 

Laundry 38. 

Nurses' Bomes 



A rmory and Athletic Pavilion 
Weights and Measures Building 
students' Observatory 
Light, Beat, and Power Plant 
Ball of Engineering 
Proposed Gymnasium 
Proposed Library 
Proposed Ball of Pharmacy 
Proposed Ball of Jurisprudence 
Proposed Ball of Medicine 

Grandstand 
Base Ball Grandstand 
Proposed Bath Ho 
Proposed Boat Bouse 
Hydraulic Power Plant 
Unity Hall 

Steam Engineering Laboratory 
Proposed Plant House 



MAP OF THE GROUNDS OF 
THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 

SHOWING LOCATION OF BUILDINGS 



P 



r 



THE 



State University oe Iowa 



IOWA CITY 

ANNOUNCEMENT 



OF THE 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

1907--1908 




Published by the University 

IOWA CITY, IOWA 

1907 



CALENDAR 


1907 


1908 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


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SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


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OCTOBER 


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NOVEMBER 


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THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1907-08 



1907 
June 7, Friday 

June 9, Sunday 
June 10, Monday 



June 11, Tuesday 



June IS, Wednes- 
day 
June 13, 14, Thurs- 
day, Friday 
June 15, Saturday 

June 17, Monday 

July 25, 26, Thurs- 
day, Friday 
July 27, Saturday 

Sept. 18, Wednes- 
day 



Sept. 23, Monday 



Anniversary exercises of the forensic 
societies, 8 p. m. 

Baccalaureate address, 4 P. M. 

Class day exercises. 

Battalion drill and dress parade. Re- 
view by the Governor of Iowa, 4 P. M. 

Class play, 8 p. m. 

Alumni day. 

Phi Beta Kappa address, 10 a. m. 

Alumni business meeting, 2 P. M. 

Alumni dinner, 6 P. m. 

Commencement, all colleges, 10 A. M. 

President's reception, 4 P. m. 

Examination for admission to all col- 
leges. 

Registration for the Summer Session, 9 

A. M. 

Instruction begins in the Summer Ses- 
sion, 7. A. M. 

Examination by the State Board of 
Educational Examiners. 

Summer Session ends. 

SUMMER VACATION 

Examination for admission. 

Registration in all colleges, 2 P. m. 
Students may register by mail or in 
person at any time during the sum- 
mer vacation. 

Instruction begins in all colleges, except 
the Graduate College, 8 a. m. 

University convocation; address by the 
President, 4 P. M. 



THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 



Oct. 1, Tuesday 

Nov. 23, Saturday 
"Nov. 25, Monday 
Nov. 28, Thursday 

Dec. 20, Friday 

1908 
Jan. 7, Tuesday 
Feb. 8, Saturday 
Feb. 10, Monday 
Feb. 21, Friday 
Feb. 22, Saturday 

April 15, Wednes- 
day 
April 21, Tuesday 
May SO, Saturday 
June 12, Friday 

June 14, Sunday 
June 15, Monday 



June 16, Tuesday 



June 17, Wednes- 
day 
June 18, 19, Thurs- 
day, Friday 
June 20, Saturday 

June 22, Monday 

July SO, 31, Thurs- 
day, Friday 
Aug. 1, Saturday 



Instruction begins in the Graduate Col- 
lege. 

First quarter ends, 10 P. m. 

Second quarter begins, 8 a. m. 

Thanksgiving Day. All exercises sus- 
pended only for the day. 

Holiday recess begins, 10 p. m. 

Work resumed in all colleges, 8 a. m. 
First semester ends, 10 p. M. 
Second semester begins, 8 a. m. 
Annual lecture of the Sigma Xi, 8 p. m. 
Washington's Birthday. University con- 
vocation. All other exercises suspended. 
Third quarter ends, . 10 P. m. 

Fourth quarter begins, 8 a. m. 

Memorial Day. All exercises suspended. 

Anniversary exercises of the forensic so- 
cieties, 8 p. M. 

Baccalaureate address, 4 P. M. 

Class Day exercises. 

Battalion drill and dress parade. Re- 
view by the Governor of Iowa, 4 P. M. 

Class play, 8 p. m. 

Alumni day. 

Phi Beta Kappa address, 10 a. m. 

Alumni business meeting, 2 p. m. 

Alumni dinner, 6 P. M. 

Commencement, all colleges, 10 a. m. 

President's reception, 4 P. M. 

Examination for admission to all col- 
leges. 

Registration for the Summer Session, 9 

A. M. 

Instruction begins in the Summer Ses- 
sion, 7 A. M. 

Examination by the State Board of 
Educational Examiners. 

Summer Session ends. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



Sept. 



16, Wednes- 
day 



Sept. 21, Monday 

Sept. 29, Tuesday 
Nov. 28, Saturday 



SUMMER VACATION 

Examination for admission. 

Registration in all colleges, 2 P. M. 
Students may register by mail or in 
person at any time during the summer 
vacation. 

Instruction begins in all colleges except 
the Graduate College, 8 a. m. 

University convocation; address by the 
President, 4 P. M. 

Instruction begins in the Graduate Col- 
lege. 

First quarter ends. 



ORGANIZATION 



The State University of Iowa embraces: 
The College of Liberal Arts 
The College op Law 
The College of Medicine 
The College of Homeopathic Medicine 
The College of Dentistry 
The College of Pharmacy 
The Graduate College 
The College of Applied Science 
The School of Music (affiliated) 

The College of Liberal Arts embraces: 
Groups of Studies Leading to the Degree of B. A. and 

B. S., AND ALSO OF B. A. AND LL. B., OF B. S. AND M. D., 

and of B. S. and D. D. S. 
The School of Political and Social Science, which includes: 
A Course in Commerce 
A Course in Administration 
A Course in Practical Philanthropy 
A Course in Modern History 
A Summer Session 

The College of Law embraces: 
A Three Years' Course 

The College of Medicine embraces: 
A Four Years' Course 
A Nurses' Training School 

The College of Homeopathic Medicine embraces: 
A Four Years' Course 
A Nurses' Training School 

The College of Dentistry embraces: 
A Three Years' Course 
A Dental Assistants' Course 

The College of Pharmacy embraces: 
A Two Years' Course 
A Graduate Course 

The Graduate College embraces: 
Graduate Courses in Thirty Departments 

The College of Applied Science embraces: 
The Civil Engineering Course 
The Electrical Engineering Course 
The Mechanical Engineering Course 
The Sanitary Engineering Course 
The Mining Engineering Course 
The Course in Forestry 
The Course in Chemistry 

Special announcements giving full information concerning any of 
these colleges or schools will be sent to any address upon request. In 
writing mention the college or school in which you are particularly in- 
terested. Address, 

President George E. MaoLean, 

Iowa City, Iowa. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 



MEMBERS EX-OFFICIIS 

His Excellency, ALBERT B. CUMMINS, Governor 

of Iowa 

JOHN F. RIGGS, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 

TERMS EXPIRE 1908 

Fourth District— ALONZO ABERNETHY, Osage 
Eleventh District— PARKER K. HOLBROOK, Onawa 
Tenth District — E. K. WINNE, Humboldt 
Third District— CHARLES E. PICKETT, Waterloo 

TERMS EXPIRE 1910 

Fifth District— THOMAS B. HANLY, Tipton 

Eighth District— JOHN W. LAUDER, Afton 

Ninth District— VERNON L. TREYNOR, Council Bluffs 

TERMS EXPIRE 1912 

Sixth District— WILLIAM D. TISDALE, Ottumwa 
First District— JOHN J. SEERLEY, Burlington 
Second District — JOE R. LANE, Davenport 
Seventh District— CARROLL WRIGHT, Des Moines 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

LOVELL SWISHER, Iowa City Treasurer 

WILLIAM J. McCHESNEY, Iowa City Secretary 

GILBERT H. ELLSWORTH, Iowa City Superinten- 
dent of Construction, Maintenance and Grounds 
PARKER K. HOLBROOK \ 

ALONZO ABERNETHY y Executive Committee 

JOE R. LANE j 
JOE R LANE Delegate to the Senate 



THE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



THE UNIVEESITY 

George Edwin MacLean, LL. D., President. 

Elmer Almy Wilcox, B. A., Secretary of the University Sen- 
ate. 

Thomas Huston Macbride, Ph. D., Director University Ex- 
tension. 

William Craig Wilcox, M. A., Secretary University Exten- 
sion. 

Herbert Clifford Dorcas, M. A., University Examiner and 
Registrar. 

Alice Bradstreet Chase, Executive Clerk. 

Fred Collins Drake, B. Ph., Secretary to the President and 
University Editor. 

Mable Montgomery Volland, B. A., Acting Dean of Women. 

Forest Chester Ensign, M. A., Inspector of Schools. 

Colonel Charles Warren Weeks, U. S. A., Commandant of 
Cadet Battalion. 

THE COLLEGES 

Amos Noyes Currier, LL. D., Dean of the College of Liberal 
Arts. 

Charles Noble Gregory, LL. D., Dean of the College of 
Law. 

James Renwick Guthrie, M. D., Dean of the College of 
Medicine. 

George Royal, M. D., Dean of the College of Homeopathic 
Medicine. 

William Suits Hosford, D. D. S., Dean of the College of 
Dentistry. 

Wilber John Teeters, Ph. C, Dean of the College of Phar- 
macy. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 9 

Laenas Gifford Weld, M. A., Dean of the Graduate College. 

William G. Raymond, C. E., Dean of the College of Applied 
Science. 

Isaac A. Loos, D. C. L., Director of the School of Political 
and Social Science. 

Frederick E. Bolton, Ph. D., Director of the Summer Session. 

Herbert C. Dorcas, M. A., Secretary of the Faculties. 

Walter Lawrence Bierring, M. D., Vice-Dean of the College 
of Medicine. 

William Le Claire Bywater, M. D., Vice-Dean of the Col- 
lege of Homeopathic Medicine. 

the hospitals 

Lee Wallace Dean, M. D., Director of the University Hos- 
pital. 

Helen Balcom, Graduate Nurse, Superintendent of the Uni- 
versity Hospital and Principal of the Training School for 
Nurses, College of Medicine. 

William Le Claire Bywater, M. D., Director of the Homeo- 
pathic Hospital. 

Alice C. Beatle, Graduate Nurse, Superintendent of the Train- 
ing School for Nurses, and the Homeopathic Hospital. 

THE LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS 

Malcolm Glenn Wyer, B. L. S., Librarian. 

Merton Leroy Ferson, LL. B., Law Librarian. 

Charles Cleveland Nutting, M. A., Curator of the Museum 

of Natural History. 
Boeumil Shimek, M. S., Curator of the Herbarium. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



ORGANIZATION 

The State University of Iowa is an integral part of the 
public school system of the State. As required by law, the 
work of the University is based upon the preparation afforded 
by the duly accredited high schools of the State, whose grad- 
uates are admitted to the undergraduate and professional 
courses upon presentation of the proper certificates. A sense 
of this vital connection with the public schools determines, in 
a large measure, the requirements for admission to the Uni- 
versity, its spirit, and its courses of study. The State, through 
the University, undertakes to furnish instruction in the various 
branches requisite for a liberal education in the liberal arts, 
law, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, music, nursing, and, in ap- 
plied science, the various branches of engineering. It also aims 
to encourage research work in all departments, to produce crea- 
tive scholars, and thus do its part in the enlargement of the 
domain of knowledge. Thus it is the general policy of the in- 
stitution to foster the higher educational interests of the State, 
broadly and generously interpreted. 

The control of the University is intrusted to a Board of 
Regents, consisting of the Governor of Iowa and the Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction ex-offlciis, and of one member 
elected by the General Assembly from each of the eleven con- 
gressional districts. 

BUILDINGS 

The University at present occupies nearly thirty buildings, 
situated near the center of Iowa City. Some of these are 
named in the order of their erection. The Old Capitol, the 
birthplace of the state, is devoted to the administrative offices 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICimE 11 

and the College of Law. The hall of physics contains the lec- 
ture rooms and laboratories of the department of physics. The 
Clinton street building has been remodeled and rearranged and 
is now occupied by the School of Music. 

The natural science hall contains the laboratories and col- 
lections of the departments of geology and botany. The hall 
of chemistry and pharmacy contains the chemical laboratories 
and the College of Pharmacy. Close Hall, the home of the 
Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations, also 
contains the halls of six of the forensic societies; the entire 
lower floor is given over to the women's gymnasium. The 
dental hall is occupied wholly by the College of Dentistry. The 
hospital of the College of Medicine and the hospital for the 
College of Homeopathic Medicine are modern structures. The 
old armory is occupied by the lecture rooms and laboratories 
of the department of electrical engineering. Three small build- 
ings furnish accommodations for the standard weights and 
measures of the state, a students' astronomical observatory 
and a carpenter shop. A modern central heating, lighting and 
power plant is connected by an underground brick tunnel with 
all the buildings on the campus. The hall of liberal arts, 120x 
260 feet on the ground, contains ninety-two rooms arranged 
for the respective departments of letters with office, seminar, 
departmental library and lecture rooms en suite. There are 
also an attractive drawing and rest room for women, psycho- 
logical laboratories and a general lecture room. The State His- 
torical Society library is also lodged in this handsome Bedford 
stone and fireproof building. The style of the building har- 
monizes with that of the Old Capitol. 

On the foundations of old south hall and the former medi- 
cal hall is a large and commodious building devoted to the 
engineering shops. 

The hall of anatomy contains dissecting rooms with the 
most modern accommodations for 20 tables, an amphitheater 
with seating capacity of two hundred and twenty-five persons, 
offices, reading rooms, and a preserving room. It is a hand- 
some hexagonal, fire-proof building of Bedford stone with 
granite foundation!. 



12 THE STATE UNIVEKSITY OF IOWA 

The second building in the new medical quadrangle con- 
tains the general and clinical laboratories of bacteriology, 
pathology, histology, physiology and pharmacology. 

The University has erected a large gymnasium and armory 
for the use of the men of the University. The building is 84 
by 162 feet in dimensions and three stories in height. In ad- 
dition to thorough equipment in the way of armory and gym- 
nasium apparatus the building contains a fifteen-lap concave 
canvas-lined running track. The building is situated just out- 
side the athletic field which contains a football gridiron, a base- 
ball field and a splendid two-fifths mile cinder track. 

The north wing of the new engineering quadrangle has 
just been erected. The portion completed is 70x125 feet and 
three stories and a basement in height. It provides lecture, 
rcitation, drawing and study rooms, with separate study space 
for each student, together with an engineering materials lab- 
oratory. 

A splendid new hall of natural sciences, a counterpart of 
the hall of liberal arts, has just been completed. This build- 
ing will ultimately be given wholly to the museum and the de- 
partments of zoology, but will accommodate temporarily the 
general library and furnish a general assembly hall to seat 
1,800 people. 

A new steam laboratory building, built of buff pressed, 
and paving brick, one story high and 40 by 80 feet in dimen- 
sions, has been erected during the past year. It is the first of 
a series of laboratories to be constructed inside the engineering 
quadrangle. 

Unity Hall, a story and basement in height, 55x70 feet 
in dimensions, and situated on the corner of Iowa Avenue and 
Clinton Street was secured by the University through purchase 
last year. It has been remodeled and newly equipped and will 
temporarily furnish additional lecture rooms for the College of 
Law. 

THE LIBRARIES 

The students have free access, in addition to the general 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 13 

and departmental libraries of the University, to the libraries 
of the State Historical Society and the free public library of 
Iowa City. This makes available about 130,000 well selected 
volumes in diverse fields of knowledge. The reading rooms of 
the several libraries are well supplied with current periodicals. 

THE LABORATORIES 

The more important laboratories are as follows: The 
chemical; the pharmaceutical; the physical; the psychological; 
the laboratories of zoology; of anatomy; of pharmacology; 
of geology and paleontology; of botany; of pathology and 
bacteriology; of histology; of physiology; and of otology. 
There is a students' astronomical observatory. 

THE NATURAL HISTORY COLLECTIONS 

are equal in extent and value to any found in connection with 
a western university. The museum of natural history contains 
the zoological, the enthnological, and part of the geological col- 
lections. The botanical material is in the herbarium under the 
charge of the department of botany, and most of the geological 
specimens are in the rooms occupied by the department of 
geology. 

THE UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

The following series of publications are now issued by 
the University: Natural History Bulletin, preserving a record 
of the work done in botany, geology, and zoology; The Transit, 
devoted to engineering; The Law Bulletin; The Bulletin of the 
Homeopathic Medical College; The State University of Iowa 
Studies in Psychology; The State University of Iowa Studies 
in Sociology, Economics, Politics, and History; Documentary 
Material Relating to the History of Iowa, published in part by 
the State Historical Society. 

LITERARY, FORENSIC, AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETIES 

The literary, forensic, and scientific societies maintained 



14 THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 

by the faculties and students of the University afford an im- 
portant means of general culture, scientific research, and liter- 
ary and forensic training. The societies thus organized are: 
The Baconian Club; The Political Science Club; The Whitney 
Society; The Philosophical Club; The Graduate Club; Die 
Germania; Edda; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi; Irving Insti- 
tute, Zetagathian Society, and Philomathean Society for young 
men; Hesperian Society, Erodelphian Society, and Octave 
Thanet Society for young women; The John Marshall Law 
Society; The Dramatic Club; The Engineering Society; The 
Hahnemannian Society; The Middletonian Medical Society; 
The Mortar and Pestle Club. Among the purely literary clubs 
are Ivy Lane, Polygon, the Writers' Club, and the Readers' 
Club. 

PUBLIC LECTURES 

The regents invite during the year many distinguished 
scholars, specialists, and men in public affairs to address the 
University. These addresses, supplemented by the series of 
popular public lectures given annually by the members of the 
faculties, and the course offered by the lecture bureau, make 
an extensive, highly interesting and instructive programme of 
entertainments. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

The University extends a cordial welcome to students of 
all denominations. The churches of the city, in which the 
members of the faculties are a large factor, take a deep inter- 
est in the welfare of the students, whom they cordially invite 
to share in their religious activities and social life. 

There are fifteen churches in Iowa City representing twelve 
denominations. 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciations are open to all students, and naturally constitute the 
center of the religious life of the University, while undertak- 
ing all the phases of moral and Christian work properly within 
the scope of such organizations. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 15 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

While women have always shared all the opportunities of 
the University on absolutely equal terms with men, it has been 
deemed expedient to appoint a dean of women, armed with 
large powers, to act as special representative and adviser for 
the women in all the departments and colleges of the Univer- 
sity, whether graduate or undergraduate, academic or profes- 
sional. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING AND ATHLETICS 

The University authorities encourage physical training in 
such amount and of such a character as is compatible with and 
promotive of the higher objects of the University. Intercolle- 
giate contests are carefully controlled in order to eliminate 
professionalism and other objectionable features. 

HOSPITALS 

The two hospitals connected with the University afford 
the best of care and treatment for students seriously ill. The 
attention of generous friends of the University is here called 
to the desirability of providing free hospital service for such 
students as are unable to meet the expenses incident to pro- 
tracted illness while away from home. 

SELF-SUPPORT 

While it is impossible for the University to guarantee 
that any student will be able to earn his way entirely or in 
part, it is just to state that it rarely happens that a student 
needing to do this fails to secure employment of some kind. 
Iowa City is a city of 9,000 inhabitants, friendly to the Uni- 
versity, and glad to give work to deserving students. The 
university faculties interest themselves to aid the students in 
finding employment, and the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. have es- 
tablished a free labor bureau which is at the service of the 
students. The associations make a canvass of the city and 
find work and suitable lodging and boarding places. 



16 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OF IOWA 

The president and the deans seek at all times the confi- 
dence of impecunious students, and heretofore have been able 
to give counsel by which students have found the way to re- 
main in the University. There are provisions whereby such 
students may obtain free tuition in the colleges of Liberal 
Arts and Applied Science. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND 
ADMINISTRATION 



George Edwin MacLean, Ph. D., LL. D. 

President. 
James Eenwick Guthrie, M. A., M. D. 

Dean ; Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Walter Lawrence Bierring, M. D. 

Vice-Dean; Professor of Theory and Practice, and Clinical Medi- 



Philo Judson Farnsworth, M. A., M. D. 

Professor Emeritus of Materia Medica and Diseases of Children. 

Elbert William Eockwood, Ph. D., M. D. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Chemistry and Toxi- 
cology. 

James William Dalbey, B. S., M. D. 

Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology. 

Charles Sumner Chase, B. S., M. A., M. D. 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Frank Thomas Breene D. D. S. 

Professor of Operative Dentistry and Therapeutics, and Superin- 
tendent of Operative Clinic. 

William Eobert Whiteis, M. S., M. D. 

Professor of Obstetrics. 

Lee Wallace Dean, M. S., M. D. 

Professor of Ophthalmology, Otology, Rhinology, and Larynology, 
and Director of the University Hospital. 

Wilber John Teeters, M. S., Ph. C. 

Professor of Pharmacognosy, Director of the Pharmaceutical Lab- 
oratory, and Dean of the College of Pharmacy. 

William Jepson, B. S., M. D., L. E. C. P. and S. 

Professor of Surgery. 

John Thomas McClintock, B. A., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



18 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OF IOWA 

Henry Albert, M. S., M. D. 

Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Henry James Prentiss, M. E., M. D. 

Professor of Anatomy, and Director of the Histological Laboratory. 



Albertus Joseph Burge, M. S., M. D. 

Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

Clarence Van Epps, B. S., M. D. 

Assistant Professor of Theory and Practice. 



John Blair Kessler, M. D. 

Lecturer and Clinical Instructor in Dermatology. 

*Jennings Price Crawford, M. D. 

Lecturer on Surgical Technique. 

Charles Schaffer Grant, M. D. 

Lecturer on Paediatrics. 

Selskar Michael Gunn, B. S. 

Lecturer on Hygiene. 

Martin Joseph Wade, LL. B. 

Lecturer on Law. 

Max Ernest Witte, M. T>. 

Lecturer on Nervous Diseases. 

Prank Harvey Cutler, B. S., M. D. 

Lecturer on Electro-Therapeutics. 

Zada Mary Cooper, Ph. G. 

Instructor in Pharmacy. 

Anfin Egdahl, B. S., M. D. 

Instructor in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Frederick Pomeroy Lord, A. B., M. D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, and Assistant in Surgery. 

Walter Henry Fox, M. D. 

Demonstrator in Anatomy, Histology, and Embryology. 

Frederick William Bailey, M. S., M. D. 

Instructor in Ophthalmology, Otology, Rhinology, and Larynology. 

John Joseph Lambert, M. S. 

Instructor in Histology and Embryology. . 
♦Died March 24, 1907. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 19 

Charles Delos Poore, A. C. 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Rudolph Ernst Klein sorge, B. S. 

Assistant Instructor in Physiology. 

Roe Eugene Remington, B. A. 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry. 

Arthur Daniel Woods, M. D. 

Assistant Demonstrator in Anatomy, Histology, and Embryology. 



Helen Balcom, Graduate Nurse. 

Superintendent of University Hospital, and Principal of Nurses' 
Training School. 

William Fred Boiler, M. D. 

Resident Physician, University Hospital. 

Joseph Maxwell Cadwallader. 

Senior Undergraduate Demonstrator in Anatomy, Histology, and 
Embryology. 

Archie West Crary, B. S., LL. B., M. D. 

Clinical Assistant in Ophthalmology, Otology, Rhinology, and 
Laryngology. 

Ira Nelson Crow. 

Assistant in Histology and Embryology. 

William McMicken Hanchett, A. B. 

Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Mary Kathrina Heard, Ph. C, B. Ph., M. D. 

Fellow in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Harry Morgan Ivins, B. S. 

Scholar in Animal Biology. 

Charles Schutz Krause, M. S., M. D. 

Assistant in Gynecology. 

Isaac Wellman Leighton. 

Undergraduate Assistant in Histology and Embryology. 

James Charles McGregor, M. D. 

Assistant Demonstrator in Pharmacology. 

William George McKay, M. S. 

Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Diedrich Janssen Meents, B. S. 

Senior Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

William John Morgan, B. S. 

Storekeeper in Chemistry. 



20 THE STATE UNIVEKSITY OF IOWA 

John Thomas Padgham. 

Undergraduate Assistant in Physiology. 

Anna Marie Slater. 

Matron of the University Hospital. 

Frederick Albert Slyfield. 

Attendant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Edgar Francis Smith. 

Junior Undergraduate Demonstrator of Anatomy, Histology, and 
Embryology. 

Frederick William Valkenaar. 

Senior Assistant in Clinical Microscopy. 

Everett Chapman Ward. 

Undergraduate Assistant in Histology and Embryology. 

jNTelson Drew Wells, B. Ph. 

Tutor in Medical Latin. 

Perry Wessel, M. D. 

Resident Physician, University Hospital. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



ORGANIZATION 

The College of Medicine, or the Medical Department as it 
was called in the beginning, was organized in 1869 but the 
first session did not open until October 11th, 1870. During the 
first thirteen years nearly all of the work was carried on in 
the basement of Old South Hall. In 1883 the department en- 
tered the four story medical building, considered at the time 
to be a model of its kind. This structure with its valuable 
museum was destroyed by the disastrous fire of March 10, 
1901, after which the present laboratory buildings were erected. 

The Mechanics Academy, noted as the first institution for 
higher education in Iowa, whose corner stone, bearing the date 
of 1842, now forms a part of the foundation of the University 
Hospital, became the first hospital (Old Mercy) of the medi- 
cal department. In 1886 the new Mercy Hospital was estab- 
lished, and during the session of 1897-1898 the present Uni- 
versity Hospital was opened. 

A comparison of the first course of study of two years of 
twenty weeks each, with the present four years of thirty-six 
weeks, taken in connection with the marked change in entrance 
requirements, is an indication of the growth of the college. 

The instruction of the college is carried on through lec- 
tures, clinics, demonstrations, and experimentation according 
to the needs of individual departments and courses. 

The course of study extends through four years of thirty- 
six weeks each. The session is divided into two semesters 
of eighteen weeks, and the semester into two quarters of nine 
weeks each. 



22 THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 

BUILDINGS 

The buildings of the College of Medicine are situated upon 
the new Medical Quadrangle, which affords space for the 
growth of the department and the systematic architectural ar- 
rangement of structures erected. 

The Hall of Anatomy is an hexagonal, fire-proof build- 
ing of Bedford stone, with granite foundations. The interior 
finish is designed to be aseptic. The building contains dissect- 
ing rooms with accommodations for twenty tables, an amphi- 
theater with seating capacity of two hundred and twenty-five 
persons, offices, reading rooms, anatomical museum, and pre- 
serving room. 

The General Medical Laboratories are in the second 
building of the quadrangle. The first floor is occupied by the 
department of physiology; the second, by the department of 
histology and embryology; the third, by the laboratories of 
pathology and bacteriology, the pathological museum, and the 
clinical laboratory. This building also contains two large am- 
phitheaters, laboratories for special research, recitation rooms, 
faculty room, library, and waiting rooms. 

Both of these buildings are new and equipped with mod- 
ern appliances for both elementary and advanced work. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

The University Hospital was erected by the University 
in 1897 at a cost of $55,000, and $10,000 have been expended 
recently in remodeling and equipping it after the most modern 
ideas. At present a new fire-proof wing is being added, which 
will cost, when equipped, $75,000. This will give the hospital 
the capacity of one hundred and thirty-five beds. 

The completed building will be ready for occupancy at 
the opening of the coming session. The full equipment will 
comprise a thoroughly furnished administration building, large 
and commodious wards as well as private rooms, a clinical am- 
phitheater with a seating capacity of more than two hundred, 
separate surgical, gynecological, medical, ophthalmological, and 
laryngological operating rooms, together with a well supplied 
Free Dispensary, open throughout the year. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 23 

CLINICS 

The large number of clinical cases treated at the Univer- 
sity hospital furnishes an abundance of cases of almost every 
character. Each case is fully utilized as a means of instruc- 
tion. Members of the senior class, under the direction of the 
instructors in charge, make a careful study of each case be- 
fore operation. Each member of the senior class is required 
to examine and report upon a number of cases each week in 
addition to observing all others. The students of the senior 
class are divided into ward-classes, of six or eight students 
each, and accompany the attending physicians in their rounds, 
being given opportunity to study the treatments given, to ob- 
serve the progress of each case, and to note the dressings used. 

CLINICAL PATIENTS 

Cases presented for clinics should be referred as follows: 
medical, to Professor Bierring; surgical, to Professor Jepson; 
gynecological, to Professor Guthrie; obstetrical, to Professor 
"Whiteis; ophthalmological, otological, rhinological, and 
laryngological, to Professor Dean; dermatological, to Dr. Kess- 
ler. 

EESIDENT PHYSICIANS 

Appointments as resident physicians in state and other in- 
stitutions are made each year from the graduates of the Col- 
lege of Medicine. These are awarded to such of the applicants 
as the faculty judges best prepared for the positions, the 
successful candidates being allowed, in the order of their rank, 
to select the hospital which they wish to serve. 

Two resident physicians are appointed for the University 
Hospital. For the present year the appointments are: Dr. 
William Fred Boiler, and Dr. Perry H. Wessel, for the Uni- 
versity Hospital; Dr. Frank Xavier Cretxmeyer, for Mercy 
Hospital, Davenport. 

PATHOLOGICAL MUSEUM 

The museum contains a valuable and varied collection of 



24 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OP IOWA 

preparations, preserved in natural colors and adapted for il- 
lustration of the different pathological conditions. The speci- 
mens are secured principally -from the University clinics and 
autopsies, by personal visits to the pathological institutes of 
the large European centers, and by contribution from profes- 
sional friends. Physicians are earnestly requested to send to 
the curator of the museum any specimens of pathological anat- 
omy. For all such favors credit will be given by labeling the 
preparations with the name of the donor before placing them 
in the museum. 



TUITION 



The following schedule of fees became operative with the 
first semester of the academic year 1904-5. 

Matriculation — Every student upon entering any depart- 
ment of the University (except students in the School of Music 
and students of the Summer Session who are not candidates 
for a degree), is required to pay a matriculation fee of $10.00. 
This fee is paid but once. 

Tuition — The tuition fee in this college is $25.00 a se- 
mester, payable in advance. The tuition fee for a student tak- 
ing half work or less is $15.00 a semester. Tuition fee will 
not be refunded. 

A student registered in more than one college of the Uni- 
versity is required to pay the tuition of the college having the 
higher rate only. Thus, students taking a combined liberal 
arts and professional course pay the tuition of the College of 
Liberal Arts — $10.00 a semester — while their work is exclu- 
sively in that college; after their professional work begins 
they pay only the tuition fee of this college. 

Students from other schools entering the college with 
advanced standing will pay ten dollars for dissecting materials 
used in making up deficiencies in this branch. For all hon- 
orably discharged soldiers or sailors of the Spanish-American 
war, who are taking a full course in this college there is a 
remission of $12.50 of each semester's tuition, making a total 
annual remission of $25.00. . 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 25 

Alumni of the college will be admitted to lectures and 
clinics free of charge, but will pay the usual laboratory de- 
posits. 

Graduation Fee — The fee for graduation is $10.00. 

Other Charges — A deposit of $3.00, to cover breakage 
and loss, is required of each student taking laboratory courses 
in pathology and bacteriology, anatomy and histology, chem- 
istry and practical pharmacy. This sum, after necessary de- 
ductions, is returned to the student. 

For each special examination given at a time other than 
those regularly scheduled by the faculty, a fee of $1.00 is 
charged; for several examinations given at one time the fee is 
$2.00. 

The charge for rental of a locker in the gymnasium (if 
desired) is fifty cents a semester; twenty-five cents is paid as 
a deposit for the locker key. 

A fee of twenty-five cents a day is charged all but new 
students for delay in registering beyond the limit officially an- 
nounced. 

Seats will be assigned by classes in the order of registra- 
tion at the University. 

A certificate of attendance will be issued to each student 
at the close of the session. 

State Board Fees — Attention of students is called also 
to the examination fee required by the State Board of Exami- 
ners, not the University, prior to admission to practice. 

ESTIMATE OF YEAELY EXPENSES 

Matriculation fee (first year only) $10.00 $ 10.00 

Tuition fee 50.00 50.00 

Breakage 2.00 to 5.00 

Eoom rent, 9 months 36.00 to 54.00 

Board, 36 weeks 90.00 to 126.00 

Books 12.00 to 20.00 



Total $200.00 to $265.00 



ADMISSION, STANDING, AND DEGREES 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

1. Each applicant for admission must present to the 
secretary of the faculty a satisfactory certificate of good moral 
character, signed by two physicians of good standing in the 
state from which he comes. 

2. The following classes of applicants may be admitted 
without examination. 

a. Graduates or matriculates of reputable universities or 
colleges who present diplomas or certificates of honorable dis- 
missal from such universities or colleges, together with a spe- 
cial certificate that they have studied Latin at least one year. 

b. Graduates of normal schools established by state au- 
thority who present diplomas or certificates of graduation, to- 
gether with a special certificate that they have studied Latin at 
least one year. 

c. Graduates of accredited secondary schools who present 
thirty preparatory-credits,* including at least one year of 
Latin. These preparatory credits must be properly certified 
by the superintendent or the principal of the school from which 
the applicant comes, on a blank form which can be obtained 
by addressing the president of the University, or the Univer- 
sity examiner. This certificate should be sent to the Univer- 
sity examiner as early in the summer as possible. 

3. Applicants who present twenty-eight preparatory-cred- 
its properly certified (as indicated under 2 c) may be admit- 
ted without examination, on condition that they complete their 
preparation within one year from the date of their admission. 



In estimating the amount of work required for admission, a pre- 
paratory credit is regarded as the equivalent of one study daily for a 
semester of eighteen weeks on the basis of four studies a day; thus 
eight credits stand for a normal year's work. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 27 

No applicant whose deficiencies exceed two preparatory credits 
will be admitted as a candidate for graduation. 

4. In September, 1907, applicants who do not present 
credentials as described above will be admitted without con- 
ditions only upon passing exam i nations in the preparatory sub- 
jects named in the program of entrance examinations given 
below. Any applicant may offer himself for entrance examina- 
tions in other preparatory subjects than those named in the 
program if, in the judgment of the University examiner, these 
are real equivalents of those named in the program, Latin only 
being excepted. 

5. The applicant who passes examinations in all of the 
subjects enumerated under 4, except such as stand for a total 
of two preparatory credits, may be admitted on the condition 
stated in paragraph 3. 

6. Applicants who present proper certificates covering 
all or any part of the preparatory studies designated under 4 
for examination, may be admitted upon passing examinations in 
enough other preparatory studies to bring the number of their 
preparatory credits up to at least twenty-eight, on the condi- 
tion stated in paragraph 3. 

7. All applicants who are admitted without Latin will 
be required to take the one-year course in medical Latin spe- 
cially provided by the University, the fee being $5.00 for the 
course. This course is not a part of the regular course in 
medicine, but is offered as a convenience for such applicants 
for admission as have not studied Latin. The class in this 
course will be organized on Monday, September 30, 1907. 
Students who take this course are required to pay the fee at 
the time when they pay the first installment of their regular 
tuition fee. 

8. Students who enter with conditions in other prepara- 
tory studies than Latin must pass the regular entrance exami- 
nations in these studies either in February or in September, 
1908. 

9. Students entering from other colleges of medicine with 
advanced standing must present credentials for preparatory 
work or be examined as stated above. 



28 



THE STATE UNIVEESITY OF IOWA 



10. Any one who expects to enter the College of Medicine 
in September is urged to send all certificates of preparatory- 
work to the University examiner as early in the summer as 
possible, and certainly before September 1. If the credentials 
are satisfactory a card of admission will be sent to the appli- 
cant at once. Upon arriving in the city he should present this 
card to the Secretary of the Board of Eegents, room 101, Old 
Capitol. 

PEOGEAM OF ENTEANCE EXAMINATIONS 





FIRST SEMESTER 




Wednesday, September 18 to Saturday, September 


• 21, 1907 


Latin, 


2 credits, 


Thursday, 


10:00 a. m 


English and 








English Grammar, 


2 credits, 


Thursday, 


1:30 p.m. 


Literature, 


2 credits, 


Thursday, 


3:00 p.m. 


General History, 


2 credits, 


Thursday, 


4:30 p.m. 


English History 


1 credit, 


Friday, 


8:00 a.m. 


U. S. History, 


1 credit, 


Friday, 


9:00 a.m. 


Civil Government, 


1 credit, 


Friday, 


10:00 a. m. 


Algebra, through 








Quadratics, 


3 credits, 


Friday, 


1:30 p.m. 


Plane Geometry, 


2 credits, 


Friday, 


3:30 p.m. 


Physics, 


2 credits, 


Saturday, 


8:00 a.m. 


Botany, 


1 credit, 


Saturday, 


9:30 a.m. 



SECOND SEMESTER 



The examinations will be held between Thursday, Febru- 
ary 6 and Saturday, February 8, 1908, according to a program 
which will be posted by the University examiner before the 
close of the first semester. 

For each separate examination given at any other time 
than that announced in the following programs, a fee of one 
dollar will be charged by the University. For a series of ex- 
aminations covering two or more subjects a fee of two dollars 
will be charged. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 29 

Any person expecting to enter the College of Medicine in 
September, should be careful to learn before the opening of 
the University exactly what entrance examinations he will be 
required to pass. He can learn this by addressing the Uni- 
versity examiner. 

Each applicant who is to be examined must arrive in the 
city early enough to be present at his first examination as in- 
dicated in the programs given. He should present himself at 
once at the office of the University examiner, who will give 
him all necessary directions. 



INCREASED REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION ON 
AND AFTER JANUARY 1, 1910 

In accordance with the recommendation of the American 
Medical Association and the National Confederation of State 
Licensing and Examining Boards, the minimum requirements 
for admission after January 1, 1910, will be four years of high 
school work and one year's work in college, including one 
year each of physics, chemistry, biology, and a foreign lan- 
guage. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

All students who enter from other schools with advanced 
standing must comply with the requirements for admission. 

Students from other accredited medical colleges who have 
attended one course of lectures will be admitted to the sopho- 
more class upon passing an examination in the branches taught 
during the first year. 

Those who have attended two courses will be admitted 
to the junior class upon passing an examination in the branches 
taught during the first and second years. 

Those who have attended three courses will be admitted 
to the senior class upon passing an examination in the branches 
taught during the first, second, and third years. At least 
thirty-four weeks of study must have been included in each 
annual course. 

In accordance with the action taken by the board of re- 



30 THE STATE UNIVEBSITY OF IOWA • 

gents, March 10, 1905, four years of residence are required 
in the College of Medicine; so that advanced standing will 
not be granted to , graduates from literary and scientific col- 
leges. This action is in conformity with the requirements of 
the Iowa, Minnesota, and other state boards of medical ex- 
aminers. 

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

Applicants for admission to the College of Medicine, not 
candidates for a degree, but desiring to register for special 
subjects, will be admitted to any course of lectures or labora- 
tory practice only upon complying with all of the regular re- 
quirements for admission to such course;, or upon satisfying 
the professor in charge of the course that they possess the 
qualifications to pursue this course. 

EXAMINATIONS FOR REMOVAL OF DEFICIENCIES 

In case of deficiency in any subject the student must be 
examined in that subject before registration at the opening 
of the next session in September; but if he fail in more than 
two subjects he will not be admitted to the September exami- 
nation. If he fail in any subject in the September examina- 
tion he will be allowed to present himself for re-examination 
only after attendance upon another course of lectures in that 
subject; or only after having prepared himself for such re- 
examination under a tutor approved by the University. A 
failure in more than two subjects at the September examina- 
tion will debar the student from admission to a higher class. 

The standing gained in each September examination is to 
be recorded as the standing for the entire year's work in each 
subject in which such examination is given. 

A student who fails in only one subject in the September 
examination will be conditioned in that subject and allowed 
to take the next year's work; but he must remove the condi- 
tion by the end of that year. 

All students having deficiencies in the medical work will 
appear for examination according to the following schedule: 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 31 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 

Surgery, 8:00 a.m. Histology, 8:00 a.m. 

Medicine, 9:00 a.m. Physiology, 9:00 a.m. 

Obstetrics, 10:00 a. m. Pathology, 10 : 00 a. m. 

Gynecology, 11:00 a.m. Anatomy, 11:00 am. 

M.itoria mcdica, 3 :00 P. M. 

Chemistry, 4 : 00 p. m. 

DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 

1. The candidate must be twenty-one years of age. 

2. He must be known to be of good moral character. 

3. His time of study must include attendance upon at 
least four full courses of lectures, the last of which must be 
taken in this institution. The time occupied by each of the 
four courses of lectures, shall not be less than thirty-four 
weeks, and no two of the four courses shall be within the same 
year. 

4. His deportment during the time must have been sat- 
isfactory to the professors and instructors of each department. 

5. His attendance upon all lectures, clinics, and other in- 
struction in the course must have been in accordance with the 
requirements of the college. 

6. He must have passed a satisfactory examination in 
each of the branches of study of the curriculum. 

7. Students of the senior class who are candidates for 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine must, before May first, pre- 
sent to the Registrar certificates of legal age. 

8. Class standing and recitation marks, together with 
demonstrators' reports and final examinations, will be taken 
into consideration in the determination of the candidate's 
fitness to receive the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MEDICINE 

Students who, upon admission to the University, have pre- 
sented preparatory work equivalent to the full requirement of 
the College of Liberal Arts, and who have completed the four 



32 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OF IOWA ■ 

years' course in medicine, may, upon the recommendation of 
the faculty of the College of Medicine, be admitted to the 
Graduate College as candidates for the degree of Master of 
Science in Medicine. Such students will be expected to select 
their major and minor subjects under the advice of the medi- 
cal faculty. The terms upon which the degree will be granted 
are the same as those pertaining to the master's degree in gen- 
eral as outlined in the Announcement of the Graduate College. 



COMBINED COUESES 

Arrangements have been made with the faculty of the 
College of Liberal Arts for a student to receive credit in one 
college for work done in another, obtaining the two degrees in 
six instead of eight years, which would be required if each de- 
gree were taken independently. These combined courses are 
especially recommended to all students who intend to enter 
the profession of medicine. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO COMBINED COURSES 

1. Some one foreign language,* 4 credits 

2. English and literature, 6 credits 

3. History, (may include civics), 2 credits 

4. Algebra, through quadratics, theory 

of exponents, and progressions, 3 credits 

5. Plane geometry, 2 credits 

6. Electives (additional accreditable 

work in foreign language, Eng- 
lish, history, mathematics, or 
science), 13 credits 



Total, 30 credits 

For a detailed statement of the requirements for admis- 
sion, see the latest announcement of the College of Liberal 
Arts. 



*Latin is preferred, but German and French are accepted. Stu- 
dents who are admitted without Latin must take the one-year course 
of medical Latin i» the University. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



33 



COMBINED COURSE OF SIX YEARS LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B. S. 

IX THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS, AND TO THE DEGREE OF 

M. D. IN THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OR THE COLLEGE 

OF HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINE 

(The requirements for admission to this course are those 
of the College of Liberal Arts, not of the professional college.) 

First Year 



German or French, 
English, 
Mathematics, 
Animal biology, 



Each Semester 



hours 
5 
2 
4 
4 



English, 
Physics, 

Animal biology, 
Botany or zoology, 



Second Year 



German or French, 
Chemistry, 
Human anatomy, 
Human physiology, 



Third Year 



Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Years 



Medical work exclusively. 



NOTES 



1. The degree of B. S. will be conferred at the end of 
the fourth year; the degree of M. D., at the end of the sixth 
year, if the work has been completed. 

2. This course must be pursued as outlined here, no sub- 
stitutions or changes in the order of studies being permitted, 
except that the English and foreign language may be trans- 
posed. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



ANATOMY 

Professor Prentiss ; Dr. Lord, Dr. Fox, Dr. Woods, Mr. Cad- 
wallader, mr. smith 

Freshman Work — The class for purposes of anatomical 
study is divided into three sections to accommodate it to the 
natural divisions of the body, i. e., head and neck, arm and 
thorax, leg and abdomen. 

Section I on entrance is assigned to the study of the 
bones of the skull and the cervical vertebrae. It receives four 
demonstrations each week for five weeks, followed by an ex- 
amination. The head of the department quizzes this section 
one hour a week on the subject matter covered, using anatom- 
ical material on which the student demonstrates his knowl- 
edge. 

Upon completing the study of skull and vertebrae, four 
weeks are spent in dissecting the main structures of the head 
and neck. An examination on the practical work is held at 
the end of that period. The head of the department conducts 
a quiz one hour a week upon a dissected specimen, requiring 
each student to demonstrate his knowledge from the cadaver. 
The section again meets with a demonstrator for five weeks in 
the consideration of the osteology and joints of the arm and 
thorax. The section then spends four weeks dissecting the 
soft parts of this third of the body. 

In the last third of the year the work treats of the bones 
and joints of the leg and abdomen, and then follows the dis- 
section of this portion of the body. Quizzes are conducted in 
the same manner as mentioned in the consideration of the 
head and neck. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 35 

Lectures — During the first semester the instructor con- 
si. lera tin- visceral anatomy in a general way and from the 
developmental point of view, as follows: 

I. Digestive tract; 

II. Diverticula of digestive tract; liver, salivary glands, 
pancreas; 

III. Eespiratory tract; larynx, trachea, bronchi, lungs; 

IV. Ductless glands; 

V. Genito-urinary tract; 

VI. Angiology; heart and its main vessels, arteries and 
veins. 

During the second semester the brain and spinal cord are 
considered in a general way. The lectures then treat in detail 
of the nerve-plexuses and major joints. The year's course of 
lectures is terminated with a general consideration of the skele- 
ton as a whole — bone composition, etc. The year's course is 
followed by two examinations. One is a practical examination 
on the bones of the entire body, the joints, and the muscular, 
arterial, and nervous systems. The second is a written exami- 
nation to test the theoretical knowledge of the student. 

Section II begins with the bones of the arm and thorax, 
then studies the leg and abdomen, and lastly the head and 
neck. Otherwise the work is as outlined for Section I. 

Section III begins with the bones of the leg and abdo- 
men, then studies the head and neck, and lastly, the arm and 
thorax. 

SopJiomore Work — The sophomore class is also divided 
into three sections. Before dissecting, the instructor meets 
each section three times a week for a period of four weeks 
and demonstrates the viscera of the part assigned, giving spe- 
cial attention to the perineum, inguinal and femoral canal, and 
both male and female genitalia. A practical examination is 
held at the end of the period. Five weeks is then spent dis- 
secting in great detail the part assigned, including the viscera 
upon which demonstrations have just been given. As with the 
freshman class there is a period of demonstrations followed by 
dissections, the demonstrations being now visceral instead of 
osteological. 



36 THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA . 

Lectures — Two lectures a week are given during the year 
to the sophomore class. The course begins with the considera- 
tion of thoracic viscera, including general anatomy and re- 
gional anatomy and the application to medicine and surgery. 
The abdominal viscera are studied next, beginning with the 
digestive tract and finishing with the genito-urinary system. A 
series of lectures is devoted to the peritoneum considering it 
from the developmental and comparative point of view, illus- 
trating by models, lower forms of animal life, and finally with 
the human body. The spinal cord and brain, including the 
membranes, are next considered. The three sections have al- 
ready considered, in the demonstration periods, the gross 
anatomy of the brain. Cranial nerves are now considered from 
their origin to their distribution. The study of the sympathet- 
ic system follows. Finally the vascular system is treated, 
stress being laid upon relations, surgical importance, surface 
markings, etc. The study of the venous and lymphatic sys- 
tems terminates the course. The head of the department dem- 
onstrates to the class in two sections each week on the lec- 
tures, following this with two quizzes each week on the lec- 
tures and demonstrations. Practical and written examinations 
for advanced standing are required at the end of the course. 

Junior Class — At the opening of the second semester a 
course in applied anatomy begins. The scalp, regional anat- 
omy referring to the brain, face and neck, thorax and abdomen, 
are considered in the order mentioned. Surgical spaces are 
considered separately, followed by surgical anatomy of the ar- 
teries. The major joints are discussed, stress being laid upon 
their relations to the coverings. Great attention is paid to in- 
guinal, femoral, and perineal anatomy. 

Senior Class — An optional course is offered in special re- 
gional anatomy. The course relates especially to the surgical 
anatomy of the ear, nose and throat, and the eye. Other spe- 
cial anatomy will be taught if desired. 

Note: An anatomical museum, or anatomical study-room 
is being developed, containing prepared specimens of every 
sort. Specially prepared boxes are provided to hold the bones 
of the head, arm and thorax, and leg and pelvis. These boxes 
are issued to students according to the part of the body that 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 37 

they are studying. The dissection room is provided with a 
mounted skeleton for reference during the dissection periods. 
A case in the dissecting room contains carefully prepared 
specimens of all the major joints. These specimens are kept 
pliable by a special fluid. 

As a result of much experimentation, a method has been 
found for keeping the material for dissection pliable and ready 
for instant use without the use of cold storage and without 
deleterious fumes. 



PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor McClintock; Mr. Kleinsorge, Mr. Padgham 

The work for the medical student in physiology is graded 
in the first two years of the medical course, and is so arranged 
by combining laboratory work with lectures and recitations as 
to be of the most practical value to students of medicine. The 
purpose of the lectures, which are illustrated, is to emphasize 
the essential facts and such accepted theories as may be neces- 
sary to explain the physiology of the human organism and, so 
far as possible, to show how the normal functions may be 
changed in pathological conditions. 

The laboratory work is arranged so that personal observa- 
tion and practical application can be made by each student of 
the facts and theories which have been emphasized in the lec- 
tures. All the necessary apparatus is provided and sufficient 
time is spent in both the first and second years to study by 
laboratory observation all that is covered in the lecture work 
of each year. 

Although during the entire course the subject of patho- 
logical physiology is treated along with the normal, in the third 
year a short course is given in which an especial effort is made 
to emphasize the close association between the normal and ab- 
normal functional activity of the organs of the human body, 
and the application of the laws of physiology to pathological 
conditions. 



38 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OP IOWA . 

*la. Elementary Physiology. 3 hrs. 

Lectures, recitations, and demonstrations dealing with the 
physiology of the plant and animal cell, the fundamental prop- 
erties of protoplasm, and the "body ingredients." Freshman 
work. Professor McClintock. 

lb. Circulatory System; Eespiratory System. 3 hrs. 

This course includes the lectures, recitations and demon- 
strations upon the blood, its circulation, upon respiratory sys- 
tem and upon the lymph and lymphatic system. Freshman 
work. Professor McClintock. 

2a. Digestion and Metabolism. 3 hrs. 

This course includes lectures and recitations upon the sub- 
jects of ferments and their action, especially the digestive fer- 
ments, the chemistry and mechanics of digestion, the absorp- 
tion of food-stuffs and upon anabolism and katabolism of cells 
and of the body. Freshman work. Professor McClintock. 

2b. Secretion and Excretion. 3 hrs. 

Lectures and recitations dealing with both the internal 
and external secretions, the changes in the secretory gland 
cells, the nervous mechanism and blood supply of the glands. 
The course also includes the physiology of the kidney and the 
skin, the urine and sweat, and their origin and excretory sub- 
stances. Freshman work. Professor McClintock. 

3a. Muscle and Nerve. 3 hrs. 

A study of the activity of muscular and nervous tissue 
under normal and abnormal conditions; a study of various 
forms of stimuli and their effect upon tissue, dealing espe- 
cially with electrical stimuli and the physiological basis of 
electro-therapy. Lectures, recitations and demonstrations. 
Sophomore work. Professor McClintock. 



*Courses with odd numbers are given in the first semester, 
those with even numbers in the second semester. Courses with 
double numbers, — e. g., 19 (20) — run throughout the entire 
year. The letters a and b following the numbers indicate re- 
spectively the first and second halves of the semester. The 
number of periods each week is indicated at the right of ths 
course. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 39 

3b. The Nervous System. 3 hrs. 

Lectures and recitations upon the brain, spinal cord, 
cranial and spinal nerves, and sympathetic system. Special 
attention is given to cerebral localization and spinal pathways, 
reflexes, and the location of possible lesions in the more com- 
mon nervous diseases. Sophomore Avork. Professor McClin- 

TOCK. 

4a. Physiology of Sensation. 3 hrs. 

All the senses are studied during this course of lectures 
and recitations. Sophomore work. Professor McClintock. 

4b. Physiology of Reproduction. 3 hrs. 

Lectures and recitations. Sophomore work. Professor 
McClintock. 

5. First- Year Experimental Physiology. 

This is a laboratory course for the students of the first 
year and is designed to cover in a practical way all of the 
subjects treated of in the first year didactic work, except the 
chemistry of digestion, which is taken in the department of 
chemistry. Professor McClintock; Mr. Kleinsorge; Mr. 
Padgham. 

7. Second-Year Experimental Physiology. 

A laboratory course of about sixty hours upon muscle and 
nerve physiology and upon the sensations, physiological optic. 
For this work the class is divided into small sections and each 
individual is given personal attention by those in charge. Pro- 
fessor McClintock; Mr. Kleinsorge; Mr. Padgham. 

8. Pathological Physiology — Elective. 1 hr. 

A course of lectures and recitations especially covering 
the physiology of the diseases of the digestive system, blood, 
circulation, excretion and the nervous system. Optional labo- 
ratory work is given with this course, time to be arranged. 
Junior work. Professor McClintock; Mr. Kleinsorge. 

9 (10). Advanced Practical Physiology — Elective. 

This course is open to those who have completed courses 
la to 8, inclusive. A special subject is assigned to each stu- 
dent for research work. He is supplied with animals and all 
needed apparatus for such work as may be selected. Where pos- 



40 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OF IOWA • 

sible the work may be followed up by direct observations upon 
patients in the University hospital. Time to be arranged in the 
senior year. Professor McClintock; Mr. Kleinsorge. 

CHEMISTEY AND TOXICOLOGY 

Professor Kockwood; Mr. Poore; Mr. Eemington 

The work of the department is conducted in the chemical 
building of the University. The outfit is ample for demonstra- 
ting the general principles of chemistry as well as its applica- 
tion to medicine. Each student is supplied with a set of the 
necessary apparatus, being obliged to pay only for that which 
is injured or destroyed. 

The course in chemistry is designed to give the student 
a thorough knowledge of fundamental principles, and to assist 
him in applying these to the problems which he will meet in 
the practice of his profession. The lectures are fully illustrated 
by experiments. 

*9. Chemistry of the Non-Metallic Elements. 3 hrs. 

Lectures and recitations. Freshman year. Three hours 
each week. Mr. Poore. 

10a. Chemistry of the Metals and Their Compounds. 3 hrs. 
Lectures and recitations. Freshman year. Mr. Poore. 

10b. Organic Chemistry. 3 hrs. 

Lectures and recitations. Freshman year. Mr. Poore. 

107 (108a.) Qualitative Analysis. 3 hrs. 

A laboratory course. It includes, first, the methods of 
testing for the matallic poisons; then a study of the common 
medicinal compounds. The student learns the methods of 
chemical manipulation and the use of apparatus, and also be- 
comes acquainted with the action of reagents and of the com- 
mon chemicals upon each other. The course includes the chem- 
ical examination of water from a sanitary standpoint, each 
student making analyses of various wholesome and polluted 
waters. First year. Mr. Poore; Mr. Remington. 

108b. Volumetric Analysis. 3 hrs. 

A laboratory course. Volumetric methods of quantitative 



*See note at bottom of page 38. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 41 

analysis are especially adapted to the needs of the physician 
because of the rapidity and ease with which they can be exe- 
cuted. The principal methods are taught and the student is 
given enough practice to familiarize him with them. Fresh- 
man year. Mr. Poore; Mr. Remington. 

227 (228). Physiological Chemistry. 2 hrs. 

Lectures and recitations. The lectures are in explanation 
and amplification of the laboratory work. They include the 
study of the proximate principles of the body and their chem- 
ical changes, also foods and digestion, blood, milk, urine, fer- 
mentation, and bacterial products. Sophomore year. Profes- 
sor Rockwood. 

229. General Physiological Chemistry. 1 hr. 
A laboratory course. The proximate principles of the 

body and food materials are prepared by the student and their 
properties and chemical changes are studied. Experiments in 
artificial digestion are made, their products being isolated and 
examined. The constituents of the blood are tested chemically 
and spectroscopically. Sophomore year. Professor Rockwood; 
Mr. Poore. 

230. Applied Physiological Chemistry. 1 hr. 
A laboratory course. The modern methods of physiolog- 
ical chemistry are used in solving problems which arise in the 
practice of medicine. These include such topics as the analy- 
sis of the gastric juice, quantitative tests being made where 
they are valuable for diagnostic purposes, the qualitative tests 
for the abnormal constituents of the urine, with the quantita- 
tive determination of such as are of importance, the identifica- 
tion of urinary sediments, of calculi, and of blood stains. Each 
student makes a complete examination of a large number of 
each of these, handing in written reports for correction and 
suggestions. Sophomore year. Professor Rockwood, Mr. 
Poore. 

231 (232). Advanced Physiological Chemistry. 5 hrs. 

This is planned for those who wish to continue the work 
of the preceding courses. The methods used in research for 
the isolation and quantitative determination of some of the 
body constituents are studied in the laboratory. The course 



42 THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ' 

may be taken as a minor for an advanced degree. Prerequi- 
sites, courses in inorganic and organic chemistry, with courses 
227 (228), 229, and 230. 

241 (242a). Toxicology. 1 hr. 

Lectures and recitations. The physiological and chem- 
ical action of the principal poisons is considered as well as their 
antidotes. The methods of identifying poisons in food, ex- 
creta, etc., are explained and illustrated by experiments. Jun- 
ior year. Professor Rockwood. 

125, 126. Toxicology. 3 hrs. 

An elective laboratory course in which are demonstrated 
the methods used for the identification and quantitative de- 
termination of poisons, as well as the methods of separating 
them from foods, clothing, and various complex mixtures. The 
post-mortem lesions are studied and the means of localization 
and recovery from the tissues of the body. Prerequisites, gen- 
eral chemistry and qualitative analysis. First or second se- 
mester. Professor Rockwood. 

142. Chemistry as Applied to Sanitary Science. 3 hrs. 

An elective laboratory course. Included in this are the 
methods suitable for the physician in testing the purity of 
water, air, milk, and other food materials, together with the 
means of detecting preservatives, adulterants, and substitutes. 
The student works independently according as the course is 
outlined by the head of the department. Junior year. Profes- 
sor Rockwood. 

251. Physical Chemistry. 2 hrs. 

An elective course; lectures twice a week. Assistant Pro- 
fessor von Ende. 

253 (254). Physical Chemistry. 1 or 2 hrs. 

An elective laboratory course. Assistant Professor von 
Ende. 

291 (292). Graduate Work. 

Suitable courses will be outlined to meet the requirements 
of the individual graduate student desiring to carry on ad- 
vanced work either as a major or as a minor in a course lead- 
ing to an advanced degree in the Graduate College of the Uni- 
versity. The applicant for such a course must satisfy the 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 43 

head of the department as to his knowledge of general chem- 
istry and as to his fitness for undertaking original investiga- 
tions. The work will be under direct supervision of the pro- 
•r in charge of the department. Time to be arranged. 
Professor ROCKWOOD. 

HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

Professor Prentiss; Dr. Fox; Dr. Woods, Mr. Lambert, 
Me. Crow, Mr. Leighton, Mr. Ward 

The department of histology and embryology occupies the 
entire second floor of the newly completed medical laboratory 
building. This building has been designed with special ref- 
erence to the requirements of microscopical work. North and 
east exposures, ample room, and unobstructed light give ideal 
conditions for this line of study. The laboratories of this de- 
partment consist of two large rooms for general class work, 
a special laboratory equipped for research work, a preparation 
room containing a complete stock of reagents, human tissues, 
and tissues of lower animals, appliances such as microtomes 
for brain sections, paraffin, and celloidin work, paraffin bath, 
and electric motors with apparatus for preparing sections of 
teeth, bone, etc. 

In connection with the laboratories are rooms devoted to 
a library, containing the latest books and journals pertaining 
to histology and embryology, a museum containing specimens 
preserved in alcohol, and several thousand microscopic slides 
of stained and injected adult and embryonic tissues. 

Classes are divided into small sections and a sufficient 
number of demonstrators are present so that each student may 
have individual attention. 

The illustrative material consists of charts, diagrams, 
models, and blackboard-drawings. Each student prepares for 
himself a complete series of 150 permanent specimens, illus- 
trating the microscopic anatomy of the human body. 

Each student is provided with a compound microscope and 
individual locker. 

The lecture room is immediately adjacent to the labora- 
tories. It has a seating capacity of 250 and is provided with 



44 THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ' 

a Zeiss epidiascope,* charts, and other appliances necessary for 
illustrated lectures. 

The work in histology and embryology is under the direc- 
tion of the professor of anatomy and is taken up in conjunc- 
tion with the course in gross anatomy. The study of the subject 
continues through the first and second years. 

fl (2). Elementary Histology. 4 hrs. 

During the freshman year the histology of the animal 
tissues exclusive of the central nervous system and the spe- 
cial senses is covered. This will include the study of the gen- 
eral tissues including the digestive tract and adnexa; the geni- 
to-urinary tract, the vascular system, the peripheral nervous 
system, etc. Each laboratory period is preceded by lectures 
in the anatomcal department illustrating the gross appearances 
and their relations to the microscopic findings. Two such lec- 
tures a week are given by Professor Prentiss. One lecture a 
week on the specialized histological features is given by Dr. 
Fox just before the laboratory periods. Two quizzes a week. 
Freshma.i work. Dr. Fox; Mr. Lambert. 

A short course in histological technique is to be given the 
freshman class, including the fixing, hardening, mounting in 
celloidin and paraffin, sectioning, staining, etc. 

3 (4). Histology and Embryology. 4 hrs. 

The year's work begins with the study of the special senses 
— skin, internal ear, eye, etc. This is followed by a series of 
embryological demonstrations. Beginning with the cell, empha- 
sis is laid upon the development of the germ layers, body cavi- 
ties, placental membranes, vascular system, genito-urinary 
tract, alimentary canal and the cerebro-spinal axis. The class 
is then ready to study the histology of the cerebro-spinal axis 
in the last quarter having by that time also received demon- 
strations in the anatomical laboratories on the gross structures 
of the brain and cord. Laboratory and demonstration work. 
Sophomore work. Professor Prentiss. 



♦This instrument is used for projection on a screen images not 
only of microscopic-slides, lantern-slides, and the like, but also of 
opaque objects, such as charts, atlases, illustrations, and specimens. 

fSee note at bottom of page 38. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 45 

5 (6). Advanced Work for Degree in Graduate College. 

As a prerequisite to advanced work the student will be 
required to possess a good working knowledge of both the 
methods and the subject matter of general histology and em- 
bryology. He will be assigned a private laboratory and offered 
such opportunities as the general laboratory and library afford. 
The department will supply the necessary materials in the way 
of tissues and reagents. 

Two courses are offered as follows: 

a. The Eye. 

The histology of its tissues, considered in relation to both 
their phylogenetic and their ontogenetic development. The 
structure and development of the retina is specially studied. 

b. The Ear. 

The investigation will proceed along the same lines as in 
the preceding course. 

Throughout the year, hours to be arranged. 

MATEEIA MEDICA AND THEEAPEUTICS 

Professor Chase; Professor Teeters, Dr. McGregor, Dr. 
Cutler, Mr. Gunn, Miss Cooper, Mr. Wells 

•1. Organic Materia Medica. 3 hrs. 

The course is introduced by definitions and a discussion 
of routes and modes of administering drugs, dosage, classi- 
fication of official preparations, and prescription-writing. Fol- 
lowing such general topics organic drugs are taken up in a 
natural order of grouping. Sophomore year. Two lectures 
and one recitation each week. Professor Chase. 
2. Organic and Inorganic Materia Medica. 3 hrs. 

Drugs of both vegetable and animal as well as inorganic 
origin are considered. As before they will be grouped with 
reference to some dominant or characteristic action. Thus are 
grouped drugs affecting the nervous system, the heart, the 
circulatory system, respiration, etc. Toward the close of the 
year a general review is given. Sophomore year. Two lec- 
tures and one recitation each week. Professor Chase. 



'See note at bottom of page 38. 



46 THE STATE UNIVEKSITY OP IOWA 

3a. Therapeutics. 3 hrs. 

General therapeutics is presented at the outset by means 
of such subjects as pneumothcrapy, hydrotherapy, balneother- 
apy, climato-therapy, psychotherapy, hypnotism, suggestion, 
heat and cold, and other general therapeutic measures more or 
less mechanical. Junior year. Two lectures and one recitation 
each week. Professor Chase. 

3b. Therapeutics. 3 hrs. 

Following the preceding course drugs of a general nature 
or such as affect the tissues of the body generally, and drug.* 
which affect particular organized systems, are presented sepa- 
rately; for example, those used to stimulate or depress the 
heart, to modify nutrition, or those which act upon the nervous 
system. Junior year. Two lectures and one recitation eac'a 
week. Professor Chase. 
4. Therapeutics. 3 hrs. 

The preceding course is followed by a discussion of local 
remedies, that is, remedies acting upon mucus membranes to 
stimulate their functional activity. Prescription-writing will 
be given careful attention throughout the year, the aim being 
to illustrate each drug with one or more practical prescriptions 
and to discuss briefly its mode of administration. Junior 
year. Two lectures and one recitation each week. Professor 
Chase. 
5 (6). Experimental Pharmacology. 

During both semesters of the third year an elaborate, 
practical laboratory course is given, illustrative of the action 
of the more important drugs upon inferior animals. Professor 
Chase; Dr. McGregor. 
8. Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. 1 hr. 

A lecture course. The history of the pharmocopaeia will be 
discussed, also metrology, with special attention to the metric 
system. The processes used in pharmacy which are of especial 
interest to the medical student will be considered, such as solu- 
tion, clarification, percolation, the determination of specific 
gravity, the preparation of emulsions, suppositories, cachets, 
tablets, triturates, etc. The prescription, from the pharmaceut- 
ical standpoint, will receive careful attention. Freshman year. 
Professor Teeters. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 47 

10b (12a). Pharmaceutical Pbeparations. 

A laboratory course. The satisfactory production of 
twenty-five preparations embracing the various classes of the 
U. S. Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary, etc., also work in 
filling prescriptions illustrative of chemical and pharmaceutical 
incompatibility is required. Freshman year, second half, sec- 
ond semester; junior year, first half, second semester; seventy 
hours. Professor Teeters; Miss Cooper. 

13 (14). Medical Latin. 2 hrs. 

Those who have had but little opportunity to study Latin 
before entering upon their medical work will be afforded an 
opportunity in this course, for special drill, with a view to 
acquiring such knowledge as must be possessed by every ac- 
curate prescription-writer. It includes such drill as is outlined 
in any good treatise on prescription-writing. In the first se- 
mester the grammar is studied with a view to presenting those 
principles of Latin etymology and construction which are es- 
sential to an intelligent use of the terminology of pharmacy 
and medicine. In the second semester the study of the gram- 
mar is continued, special attention being given to pharma- 
copasial nouns and expressions. The prescription is taken up, 
its definition, its synthesis comprising form, grammatical con- 
struction, language, etc., followed by its analysis. A review of 
the entire work completes the course. Mr. Wells. 

15 (16). Electro-Therapeutics. 

The instruction is didactic, clinical, and experimental. 
The construction and manipulation of the various forms of 
electrical apparatus are first considered and the practical work- 
ings of batteries and their accessories are demonstrated. The 
fundamental laws of electricity are given briefly, those of use 
to the student and practitioner being emphasized. The con- 
sideration of the currents in common use follows. The uses 
of the galvanic, cautery, and faradic batteries are fully ex- 
plained. The physiological effect of the various modalities, 
their therapeutical uses and indications by clinical instruction 
is made plain. The static machine, the coil, high-frequency 
apparatus, Finsen light, X-ray apparatus with all of its acces- 



48 THE STATE UNIVEKSITY OF' IOWA 

sories, electric light cabinets are explained. A thorough course 
in electricity and all its specials is given. 

A. Didactic course, junior year, twenty hours, Dr. Cutler. 

B. Clinical course, senior year, eighty hours, Dr. . 

18. Hygiene. 

This course consists of seventy hours, thirty-five of which 
are devoted to lectures and recitations, the remainder of the 
time being spent in the laboratory. 

In the lectures the following subjects are discussed from 
their hygienic point of view: water, sewage, plumbing, air, 
ventilation and heating, light and lighting, soil, disposal of the 
dead, disposal of refuse, disinfectants and disinfection, quar- 
antine, foods, milk, food preservation, hygiene of occupation, 
offensive trades, relation of insects to disease, prevention of 
tuberculosis, venereal diseases and all other contagious and in- 
fectious diseases, vital statistics, functions of boards of health, 
personal hygiene and other questions that are of importance in 
preventive medicine. 

The laboratory work consists of the chemical, bacteriologi- 
cal, and microscopical examination of water, milk, and foods, 
the testing for common adulterants, the testing of disinfec- 
tants, and other points of interest and value in the study of the 
preservation of health. Junior class. Mr. Gunn. 

PATHOLOGY AND BACTEEIOLOGY 

Professor Albert ; Dr. Egdahl, Mr. Meents, Mr. Valkenaar 

The department of pathology and bacteriology occupies 
the rooms on the third floor of the new laboratory building of 
the College of Medicine. This floor has two large laboratories 
for the general work of the department a large room 
for the special bacteriological work connected with the Iowa 
State Board of Health, a photographic room, a large room for 
the pathological museum, with twelve places for students doing 
special research work or carrying on original investigations, 
and five small rooms for office, preparation, and other special 
purposes. All of the laboratories are well-lighted, completely 
furnished and thoroughly equipped with new microscopes of 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 49 

the most modern type, and with all the apparatus necessary for 
Carrying on any kind of investigation in the field of pathology 
or bacteriology. Each student is provided with a special com- 
posite topped table, a microscope, a locker, and the necessary 
staining reagents. 

By reason of special association with the pathological in- 
stitutes of Vienna, Leipzig, and Munich, the department has 
come into possession of a most complete and varied collection 
of diseased tissues and organs for the study of general and 
special pathological histology. 

The course in pathology and bacteriology extends through 
the sophomore, junior and senior years, and is presented by 
means of lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory 
work. The lectures are illustrated by means of drawings, 
charts, and the Zeiss epidiascope (described on page 44). 
Preparations from the medical museum and fresh specimens 
derived from post-mortem examinations and the university 
clinics, are also used for illustration. The laboratory work 
comprises a thorough drill in pathological and bacteriological 
technique, in the preparation and study of microscopical speci- 
mens of the various diseased conditions that occur in the hu- 
man tissues and of all the more important micro-organisms. 

*1 (2). General Pathology and Pathological Hiistology. 

3 hrs. 
A lecture, recitation, demonstration, and laboratory course 
including the causation of disease processes, the disturbances 
in circulation and nutrition, inflammation and the various re- 
trogressive and progressive disturbances of metabolism. The 
laboratory work will require two hours' work each week during 
the second semester. It comprises the preparation and study 
of slides illustrating the general pathologic changes that occur 
in the human tissues. Special attention is given to the draw- 
ing of the microscopic specimens. Second year. Professor 
Albert; Dr. Egdahl; Mr. Meents. 

3. Pathology op Disturbances of Metabolism. 1 hr. 

This course deals with the pathology of such general dis- 
eases, as gout, diabetes, mellitus, diabetes insipidus, arithitis 



♦See note at bottom of page 38. 



50 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OF IOWA 

deformans, obesity, etc., that are produced or supposed to be 
due to disturbances in the metabolic processes of the body. 
The more important chemical and physiological factors causing 
the pathological conditions, or resulting from them will be con- 
sidered. Dr. Egdahl. 

4. Surgical Pathology. 4 hrs. 
A lecture, recitation, demonstration, and laboratory course 

comprising the several subjects in surgical pathology but pay- 
ing most attention to the study of tumors. The extensive ma- 
terial from the University clinics is utilized, and this, with the 
collection in the possession of the laboratory, affords an op- 
portunity for studying every variety of tumor formation. Spe- 
cial attention is paid to the differential gross and microscopical 
diagnosis of the tumors of most clinical interest and practical 
importance. Test examinations of unknown specimens are fre- 
quently given. Sophomore year. Professor Albert; Dr. Eg- 
dahl. 

5. Bacteriology. 8 hrs. 
A lecture, recitation, and laboratory course, which in- 
cludes the preparation of artificial culture-media, the cultiva- 
tion of micro-organisms, and their separation by means of plate 
cultures, the staining, recognition, and diagnosis of the dif- 
ferent micro-organisms, especially those related to the various 
infectious disease processes. 

Special attention is given to the bacteriological analysis 
of water, and the practical application of bacteriologic tech- 
nique to hygiene and clinical diagnosis. The lectures include 
such subjects as cannot properly be pursued in connection with 
the laboratory work. About seventy different micro-organisms 
are studied in the laboratory. The department is fortunate in 
having associated with it, the State Board of Health Bacterio- 
logical Laboratory, which furnishes much material that is util- 
ized for class work. Junior year. Professor Albert; Dr. Eg- 
dahl; Mr. Valkenaar; Mr. McKay. 

6. Special Pathology and Pathological Histology. 6 hrs. 

This course deals with the pathology of the special tissues 
and organs of the human body. The lectures are supplemented 
by demonstrations of gross pathological preparatior.3 derived 
from the clinics, autopsies, and the pathological museum. Ev- 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 51 

ery fourth lecture will be illustrated by the use of the epidia- 
scope. The laboratory work will comprise the preparation and 
study of microscopic sections, illustrating so far as possible, 
the subjects considered in the lectures. One session each week 
is devoted to the study of gross pathological material. Junior 
year. Professor Albert; Dr. Egdahl; Mr. Meents. 

7a. HEMATOLOGY. 

A lecture, recitation, demonstration, and laboratory course 
devoted to the study of blood. The course will begin with a 
consideration of the technique necessary for making a blood 
examination, and the student will receive thorough training in 
the use of the Thoma-Zeiss and Gower's Hemocytometers, the 
Von Fleishl and Gower's hemoglobinometers, the Hammer- 
schlog apparatus, the hematocrit, and the various other instru- 
ments necessary for a blood analysis. This is followed by a 
consideration of the general and special pathology of the blood 
— the student being supplied with cover-glass preparations rep- 
resenting the more important pathological conditions of the 
blood. The abundance of clinical material at the University 
hospital affords oportunity for thorough training in this sub- 
ject. Senior year; one lecture and two hours of laboratory 
work each week. Professor Albert; Dr. Egdahl. 

7b (8a). Clinical Microscopy. 

A lecture, recitation, demonstration, and laboratory course 
devoted to the study of urine, sputum, stomach contents, vouii- 
tus, faeces, milk, dropsical effusions, cyst contents, and animal 
parasites; also instruction in pathological technique, and such 
methods of clincal diagnosis as involve the usual microscopical 
and bacterial analyses. Special attention is given to the rapid 
diagnosis of fresh material, uterine curettings, and the early 
signs of malignancy. Senior year; one lecture and two hours 
laboratory work each week. Professor Albert; Dr. Egdahl; 
Mr. Valkenaar. 

9 (10). Autopsies. 

Post-mortem examinations are made of all available cases. 
Since no stated time can be set for these demonstrations, mem- 
bers of both junior and senior classes are excused from other 
work in hand to attend the clinical autopsies. 

Students are permitted to assist at post-mortem examina- 



52 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OP IOWA 

tions and are instructed in the methods of making such exami- 
nations and of recording proper protocols of the results. Com- 
plete microscopical and bacteriological examinations are made 
of all pathological material and submitted to the students for 
comparison with the microscopic changes. Professor Albert; 
Dr. Egdahl; Mr. Meents. 

12a. Pathological Technique. 10 or more hrs. 

An optional laboratory course designed for those who de- 
sire to specialize in pathology. The work will include the 
principles and general methods of the investigation of such 
material as usually comes to the pathologist for diagnosis. Also 
the principles and methods involved in research work. Number 
in class limited to six. This course is also open to students in 
the Graduate College. Ten hours (or as much more time as 
desired). Professor Albert; Dr. Egdahl. 

13. Bacteriological Technique. 12 hrs. 

A laboratory course designed for advanced students and 
for physicians who desire to specialize in bacteriology. The 
course is intended principally to prepare the student for such 
duties as are usually required of health officials. The work 
will include the technique necessary for every form of bacte- 
riological analysis. The drill in practical work will be thorough 
and complete — such that the graduates of the course will be 
competent and reliable bacteriologists. Number in the class 
limited to six. This course is also open to students in the 
Graduate College. Twelve hours each week, during the first 
semester, or twenty-four hours each week, during the second 
quarter of the first semester. Professor Albert; Dr. Egdahl. 

15 (16). Graduate Work. 

The department offers opportunities, to candidates for 
higher degrees, for special work in pathology and bacteriology. 
The student will be assigned a private laboratory, will have free 
access to the special laboratories of the department and will 
be supplied with the tissues and reagents necessary for the 
work of such a course. Course and time to be arranged. Pro- 
fessor Albert. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 53 

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE 

Professor Bierring; Assistant Professor Van Epps, Dr. 
McClintock, Dr. Grant, Mr. Ivins 

The instruction in internal medicine is given by lectures, 
recitations, reviews, and clinics. Special attention is given to 
the physical examination of patients and analysis of secre- 
tions, in order to interpret systematically the clinical findings. 

The pathology, pathogenesis, clinical course of disease, 
and applied therapeutics are regarded as of special importance. 
By reason of the continued increase in the number of clinical 
cases it is possible to illustrate most of the diseases treated in 
the didactic courses. As a considerable number of patients are 
subsequently referred for operative treatment, the student has 
the opportunity of seeing the cases considered by more than 
one department. 

The laboratory of the medical clinic is well equipped with 
all apparatus and reagents necessary for medical diagnosis, 
and furnished with general and special handbooks. 

Sophomore Year 

*2. Introductory Course. 1 hr. 

An introductory course to the study of internal medicine, 
including the principles of physician's diagnostic methods. 
Assistant Professor Van Epps. 

Junior Year 

3. Percussion and Auscultation. 2 hrs. 

A demonstration and recitation course in which the student 
is trained in inspection, percussion, and auscultation of the 
normal body, especially the thorax, after which the same meth- 
ods are applied in examining morbid changes in typical cases, 
the student being required to carry on the work personally 
under the supervision of the instructor. Assistant Professor 
Van Epps. 

4. Physical Diagnostics. 2 hrs. 
A demonstration course in which the work in physical ex- 



*See note at bottom of page 38. 



54 THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 

animation of patients is continued; it includes the special 
methods applied in the examination of the abdominal organs 
and the nervous system. Instruction is also given in the taking 
of clinical histories. Assistant Professor Van Epps. 

5 (6). Theory and Practice of Medicine. 3 hrs. 

A lecture and recitation course. The study of internal 
medicine begins in the junior year, in the first three months of 
which there are two lectures and one recitation weekly on some 
elementary principles of medicine and the more important acute 
infectious diseases. In the rest of the year three recitations 
are held weekly on assigned topics regarding diseases or organs. 
Professor Bierring; Assistant Professor Van Epps. 

7 (8). Clinical Medicine. 4 hrs. 

Two clinical conferences are held each week at which cases 
are presented for diagnosis and treatment. In the fourth term 
the junior students are assigned to cases in sections to take 
the history, work out the present condition and write the re- 
sults. The histories are read in whole or part at the clinic. 
Professor Bierring. 

Senior Year 

9 (10). Theory and Practice of Medicine. 4 hrs. 

A lecture and recitation course, including specially dis- 
eases not considered in the junior year, and not often seen in 
the clinic. In beginning the study of a disease, a lecture is 
given on the same, after which topics are assigned for text- 
book and reference work upon which recitations are held. 
Frequent use is made of charts, diagrams, pathological speci- 
mens, and clinical records from the hospital, to .illustrate the 
different phases of the disease under consideration. Professor 
Bierring. 

11 (12). Ward Classes. 2 hrs. 

Sections of the senior class are given special bedside in- 
struction in treatment and daily visits are made, to observe 
the progress of cases and to practise diagnostic methods. Pro- 
fessor Bierring; Assistant Professor Van Epps. 

13 (14). Clinical Medicine. 4 hours. 

Two clinics are held each week at which cases are pre- 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 55 

sented for diagnosis and treatment. Patients are assigned to 
members of the senior class, who take the history, examine the 
present condition, and write the results, with differential diag- 
nosis and plan of treatment. Each case is to be followed by 
the student assigned as long as it remains in the hospital. 
Whenever practicable, methods of treatment such as massage, 
lavage, etc., are carried out by the student. The histories are 
read in whole or part at the clinical conferences. Professor 
Bierring. 

15 (16). Practical Electro-therapeutics. 3 hrs. 

A demonstration course on the use of electricity in the 
diagnosis and treatment of disease. Advanced students are 
instructed to apply the different methods of treatment per- 
sonally and thus to obtain a practical knowledge. The student 
is taught also the methods of generating X-rays and of em- 
ploying them in diagnosis and therapeutics. Special work is 
also carried on in skiagraphy and its relation to diagnosis. As- 
sistant Professor Van Epps. 

17 (18). Neurology. 1 hr. 

A lecture, recitation, and demonstration course on nervous 
diseases and neurological diagnosis, with special reference to 
the relation of neuro -pathology to clinical neurology. Assis- 
tant Professor Van Epps. 
20a. Pediatrics. 40 hrs. 

This subject is presented by means of lectures and recita- 
tions. Special stress is laid upon diagnosis, particularly of the 
contagious diseases and those of the gastro-enteric tract. The 
practical treatment of the common ills of infancy and child- 
hood receives careful attention. Forty hours. 

Most of the infants born in the obstetric clinic are arti- 
ficially fed and each student is required to become thoroughly 
familiar with this important branch. 

Throughout the year sick children are presented before 
the general medical clinic. Dr. Grant. 

21 (22). Clinical Laboratory, Advanced Work and Spe- 
cial Eesearch. 

A clinical laboratory of the department of internal medi- 
cine is located on the third floor of the general laboratory hall; 



56 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OF IOWA 

this, in connection with the clinical laboratory in the Univer- 
sity hospital affords ample opportunities to senior and ad- 
vanced students to pursue special research in internal medicine. 

Each member of the senior class is required to carry on 
all chemical and microscopic analyses necessary in the study of 
patients assigned to him, under the supervision of the head 
and the clinical assistant of the department. 

Ample provision has been made for all special apparatus 
in hasmatology, cryoscopy, and the estimation of blood pressure. 

Candidates for higher degrees and members of the Grad- 
uate College may, in the clinical laboratory, carry on special 
work in internal medicine leading to such degrees under the 
supervision of the head of the departmnt. Professor Bierring. 

SURGERY 

Professor Jepson; Assistant Professor Burge, Dr. Lord, 
Dr. 

This subject is graded in the third and fourth years, and 
is taught by lectures and recitations; by laboratory work in 
minor surgery, operations on the cadaver, and surgical tech- 
nique; by ward classes, and by clinics in the University hospi- 
tal, at which operations in every branch of surgery are open 
to the class. 

*1. Principles of Surgery. 3 hrs. 

Hyperemia; simple inflammation; infective inflammation; 
the process of repair; gangrene; shock; fever; surgical fevers; 
septicaemia; pyaemia; erysipelas; hospital gangrene; tetanus; 
hydrophobia; actinomycosis; anthrax; glanders; snake-bite; 
tuberculosis; surgical tuberculosis of joints and bones; syphilis. 
Lectures and recitations; junior and senior years. Professor 
Jepson. 
2. Practice of Surgery and Orthopedic Surgery. 4 hrs. 

Injuries and diseases of regions and systems; fractures 
and dislocations; deformities, with general principles of pa- 
thology and treatment. Lectures and recitations; junior and 
senior years. Professor Jepson. 



♦See note at bottom of page 38. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 57 

5. Minor Surgery, Bandaging, and Dressing. 2 hrs. 
Practical instructions, by demonstration and practice, in 

the various manipulations of minor surgery, including the ap- 
plication of splints and bandages. Junior year. Assistant 
Professor Burge; Dr. Lord. 

6. Operative Surgery. 2 hrs. 
A dissecting-room course, consisting of all the operations 

in modern surgery, performed by sections of the class, under 
the supervision of instructors. Senior year. Assistant Profes- 
sor Burge; Dr. Lord. 

7. Operative Technique. 1 hr. 
Lectures and practical work on operative procedures, prin- 
ciples of asepsis, antisepsis, and sterilization; preparation of 
patient and operator, of instruments and operating rooms; 
anaesthesia and anaesthetics; haemostasis; ligatures, sutures; 
dressing and care of wounds. The technique of kidneys, gall- 
bladder, stomach, and intestinal surgery, and other operations, 
such as trephining, tracheotomy and intubation, are illustrated 
before the class on the lower animals under antiseptic regula- 
tions. Junior year. Dr. . 

9 (10). Clinical Surgery. 6 to 8 hrs. 

Clinics, at which advanced students are required to assist, 
and at which operations and manipulations in general surgery 
are demonstrated to juniors and seniors, and to other students 
whose schedule does not prevent attendance. Professor Jep- 
son. 

11 (12). Ward Classes. 5 hrs. 

Examinations, observation, and surgical-dressing of pa- 
tients, in wards of the University hospital, in company with 
the assistant to the chair of surgery. Class in sections; senior 
year. Assistant Professor Burge; Dr. Lord. 

13 (14). Anaesthetics. 

Each member of the class will receive practical instruction 
in the production of general and local anaesthesia, under the 
supervision of the anaesthetist of the surgical clinic. Class in 
sections, one section a week. Junior year. 



58 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OF IOWA 

OBSTETEICS 

Professor Whiteis; Dr. Krause 
This course embraces a thorough training in diagnosis cf 
pregnancy, the physiology and pathology of pregnancy, diagno- 
sis of presentations and positions, the management of labor, 
normal and abnormal, measurements of the pelvis, and a com- 
plete course upon surgical obstetrics; taught by wet specimens, 
upon the manikin, and upon patients when practicable. From 
twelve to twenty confinements are studied before the class 
each year. 

The class is divided into sections for study and drill in 
diagnosis and in operative obstetrics. 

*1 (2). General Obstetrics. 3 hrs. 

Lectures upon obstetrics, including a discussion of the 
physiology, pathology, and management of gestation, manage- 
ment of labor, normal and abnormal, management of the puer- 
perium, dystocia, and care of new-born child. Junior year. 
Professor Whiteis. 
3,4. Operative Obstetrics. 

Course of six lectures, illustrated by both dry and wet 
specimens. Senior year. Professor Whiteis. 
5 (6). Course Upon the Manikin. 1 hr. 

A course for the diagnosis and demonstrating the use of 
forceps and other mechanical appliances in obstetrical manipu- 
lation. Equivalent to one hour each week during the session. 
Senior year. Professor Whiteis. 

GYNECOLOGY 

Professor Guthrie; Professor Whiteis, Dr. Krause 

The instruction in this subject for both junior and senior 
classes combines lectures, recitations, and demonstrations in 
both major and minor operative gynecology. 

*1 (2). Bedside Clinic. 1 hr. 

A ward clinic is held every week, where each student has 

an opportunity to examine the patient and to observe both the 



"See note at bottom of page 38. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 59 

post-operative condition and the treatment of all operative 
cases. The merits of each case are discussed and indications 
for after treatment carefully studied. Students are drilled in 
the matter of special diet and hygiene. Senior year. 

3 (4). Ward Class. 2 hrs. 

A course in diagnosis is given each week throughout the 
year, at which sections of the class are instructed and drilled 
in the matter of securing good histories. They are taught how 
to conduct an examination of a patient and from the history 
and the physical condition to form correct diagnosis. Senior 
year. 
5 (6). General Gynecology. 2 hrs. 

The first semester is occupied with lectures on the general 
scope of the subject, methods of examination etiology, pa- 
thology, and general management of gynecological patients. The 
rest of the course is devoted to a discussion of special con- 
ditions, operative and gynecological technique. Junior and 
senior years. 

7 (8). Clinic. 3 hrs. 

A clinic held each week, demonstrating methods of exami- 
nation and diagnosis, and illustrating both major and minor 
gynecological operations. A constant effort is made to instruct 
in modern methods and improved technique. Junior and sen- 
ior years. 

9. Gynecological Landmarks. 1 hr. 

The study of landmarks and cultivation of the sense of 
touch in palpating pelvic viscera. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY, OTOLOGY, EHINOLOGY, AND 
LARYNGOLOGY 

Professor Dean; Dr. Bailey, Dr. Heard, Dr. Crary. 

The department of ophthalmology, otology, rhinology, and 
laryngology occupies the ground floor of the east wing of the 
University hospital. The suite of rooms comprises a large 
waiting room, a clinical room, a combined operating and 
treatment room, and a clinical laboratory. 



60 THE STATE UNIVEESITY OF IOWA 

The clinical room is supplied with lights on brackets with 
universal movement, so that each student' has both gas and 
electric light for his individual work. The treatment and 
operating room is well equipped with instruments for opera- 
tions upon the eye, ear, nose, and throat and for their treat- 
ment. 

Connected with the clinical room is a clinical laboratory 
in which arc microscopical specimens of all the diseases of the 
eye, ear, nose, and throat. There is also an abundance of 
anatomical sections showing the pathological, the normal, and 
the anomalous conditions of the eye, ear, nose, and throat. 
These specimens are prepared and arranged so that the stu- 
dent may study them at his leisure. After diagnosing his case 
in the clinic room, he may in an adjacent room examine the 
gross and microscopical characteristics of the disease present. 
Examinations of the various secretions and discharges obtained 
in the clinic are made here. 

Bacteriological investigations may also be made in this 
laboratory. In the new laboratory building is a clinical labora- 
tory for this department. This laboratory is abundantly sup- 
plied with pathological specimens of diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose, and larynx, as well as normal anatomical specimens of 
these organs. These specimens have the soft parts adherent to 
the bone, and are hardened in formaldehyde and alcohol. The 
laboratory is well equipped with microscopes, microtomes, and 
instruments and apparatus for the dissection of specimens. The 
laboratory also contains specimens already dissected to which 
the student may refer at any time. 

Any senior or graduate student wishing to make a special 
study of these subjects is given free use of these specimens 
and instruments and is furnished with the anatomical material 
for dissection, both normal and pathological, and with material 
for mounting specimens, etc. 

Instruction in this department is given by lectures, rec- 
itations, demonstrations, and personal work in the clinic. The 
three kinds of clinics, the out-clinic, treatment-clinic, and the 
clinic for major operations are attended only by groups of stu- 
dents. By this group-method of instruction each student re- 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 61 

ivivos personal instruction at each session and at the operating 
clinic is able to see the operation. 

In the out-clinic each student is assigned one or more pa- 
tients whom he himself must examine and diagnose, and for 
whom he must recommend treatment. 

The instructors in charge of the clinic, discuss each new 
case with the student who has had charge of it, pointing out 
mistakes and calling attention to important features of the 
diagnosis and of the differential diagnosis. 

The treatment clinic is visited by patients who have been 
subject to operation and who need daily care. The students, 
two at a time, attend these treatment clinics and assist in 
the treatment, and are given demonstrations in the treatment 
of such cases as they cannot well handle themselves. 

At the operating-clinic which is held in the surgical operat- 
ing room of the hospital are performed only the major opera- 
tions on the eye, ear, nose, and throat. The entire class at 
tends these clinics, -groups of six students being called from 
time to time to witness the operations close at hand. In this 
way each student during the year gets a close view of all the 
different kinds of operatons. 

Special attention is given to refraction. The department 
is well equipped with apparatus and instruments for studying 
the refraction of the eye. Groups of students are given dem- 
onstrations on the opthalmometer, amblyometer, deviometer, 
etc., and are given instruction in the use of the opthalmoscopa 
and retinoscope. At the out-clinic students are assigned by 
twos to the practical consideration of refraction cases and 
under the direction of instructors are required to determine 
the error of refraction and to prescribe lenses and fit the 
frames, first having gone over all the objective and subjective 
tests. For such students as wish to take special work in re- 
fraction a course is given in which the finer and more intricate 
tests are explained, including the examination of the extra- 
ocular muscles and pathological conditions as they may exist 
in the back of the eye. 

Three out-clinics, three treatment-clinics, and one oper- 
ative-clinic are held in this department each week, in order 
that the class may do work in sections. 



62 THE STATE UNTVEESITY OF IOWA 

•1. Methods of Examination and Diagnosis. 2 hrs. 

The anatomy and physiology of the eye, ear, nose, and 

throat. Diseases of the ear, nose, and throat; of the eyelids 

and the eyeball. Senior year. Professor Dean; Dr. Bailey. 

2. Diseases op the Eye and Ear. 2 hrs. 

Fundus lesions and relations of diseases of the eye to in- 
ternal medicine; diseases of the ear, nose, and throat. Senior 
year. Professor Dean; Dr. Bailey. 

3 (4). Befraction. 

In connection with the out-clinic students, two at a time, 
adjust refractive errors of patients. Senior year. Professor 
Dean; Dr. Bailey; Dr. Heard; Dr. Crary. 

5 (6). Operations on the Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

The class in sections will perform major operations on 
temporal bones hardened in alcohol and eye-operations upon 
eyes fixed in a manikin. Senior year. Professor Dean; Dr. 
Bailey. 

7 (8). Practical Clinical Instruction. 2 hrs. 

Out-clinics at the University hospital in the diagnosis of 
diseases of the eye, ear, nose, and throat, in methods of exam- 
ining, in the practical use of the instruments, and in the appli- 
cation of operative and medical remedies. Groups of not more 
than twenty students each. Senior year. Professor Dean; 
Dr. Bailey; Dr. Heard; Dr. Crary. 

9 (10). Clinic. 1 hr. 

Once a week major operations on the eye, ear, nose, and 

throat. Senior year; two or three hours at a time. Professor 
Dean; Dr. Bailey. 

11, 12. Anatomy op the Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 4 hrs. 
Clnical, microscopical and practical anatomy of the eye, 
ear, nose, and throat. Course optional. Number limited to two. 
Dr. Bailey. 

13 (14). Treatment Clinic. 

Three clinics a week are held. Students two at a time at- 
tend and treat patients suffering with diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose, and throat. Senior year. Dr. Bailey. 



*See note at bottom of page 38. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 63 

15 (16). Graduate Work. 

Courses are offered for students who have their baccalau- 
reate degree, and such persons may choose either their major 
or minor in this department. They are allowed to take the 
senior work of this department during their junior medical 
year and then are prepared to do the advanced work during 
their senior year. 

Courses for graduate students with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine are arranged to suit individual needs. 

The course in advanced refraction includes all special 
tests. Students are assigned the entire care of certain pa- 
tients. The record is turned in to the instructors for examina- 
tion and correction. 

Graduates are allowed to assist in out-clinics, making 
some of the treatments and aiding in the demonstration of 
certain cases. 

Ward classes are conducted by the head of the department 
and the instructors, thus making it possible for the students to 
follow the after-treatment carefully. 

DERMATOLOGY 

Dr. Kessler 

Lectures, recitations, and clinics are given during the 
senior year. Throughout the session one hour and a half a 
week. 

DENTISTRY 

Professor Breene 

The lectures on this subject comprise such principles of 
dental pathology and therapeutics as are essential to the prac- 
titioner of medicine. Instruction is given in the application 
of mechanical appliances for the correction of cleft palate, also 
in methods of applying retention in fractures of maxilla. Sen- 
ior year, second semester, five hours. 



64 THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

Judge Wade 

The course is opened with the consideration of the na- 
ture and purposes of law, then of laws affecting the practice 
of medicine. Malpractice is discussed and the liability of the 
physician to the patient and others, including the liability of 
municipalities for the treatment of patients. The questions 
of legal insanity, expert evidence and expert witnesses, hypo- 
thetical cases, causes of death, and post mortem examination 
follow, and, in conclusion, the subject of state and local 
boards of health, quarantine regulations, etc. Senior year, 
first semester, twelve hours. 

TEXT-BOOKS AND BOOKS OF REFERENCE 

The following are recommended by the faculty: 

Medical Dictionary — Gould, Duane, Dunglison. 

Anatomy — Cunningham, Huntington on the Peritoneum, 
Gray, Morris, Gerrish, Treve's Surgical Applied Anatomy. 

Physiology — Brubaker, Howell, Hall, American Text Book, 
Kirkes. 

General Chemistry — Remsen, Smith, Roscoe and Schorleni- 
mer. 

Analytical Chemistry — Rockwood. 

Physiological Chemistry — Rockwood, Hammersten, Simon, 
Herter. 

Urine Analysis — Purdy, Ogden. 

Toxicology — Haines and Peterson. 

Surgery — Park, American Text-Book of Surgery, DaCosta, 
Stimson on Fractures and Dislocations, Wharton's Minor Sur- 
gery and Bandaging, Warren's Surgical Pathology, Senn on 
Tumors. 

Pathology — Colpin, Stengel, Delafield & Prudden, Thayer, 
American Text-Book, Warren's Surgical Pathology, Kauffman 
■ — Specielle Pathologische Anatomie; Ziegler, Green. 

Bacteriology — McFarland, Muir & Ritchie, Crookshank, 
Park, Williams, Levy & Klemperer, Goadby — The Mycology of 
the Mouth, Prescott & Winslow — Elements of Water Bacteriolo- 
gy- 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 65 

Bacteriological Technique — Eyre. 

Clinical Diagnosis — Leuhartz, Boston, Simon, Wood, Em- 
erson. 

Hematology — Ewing, Cabot, DaCosta. 

Practice of Medicine — Osier, Anders, Hare, Tyson, French, 
Strumpel, Thompson, Eichorst, American Text-Book of Theory 
and Practice of Medicine, Albutt's System. 

Physical Diagnosis — Cabot, Herrick, Tyson. 

Medical Diagnosis — Butler, Musser, Vierordt, DaCosta, 
Flint. 

Obstetrics — Williams, American Text-Book of Obstetrics, 
Dorland, Herst. 

Obstetric Surgery — Grandin and Jarmin. 

Embryology — Minot, Manton. 

Gynecology — Skene, Thomas and Munde, Garrigues, 
American Text-Book, Pozzi, Davenport, May's Manual, Clin- 
ical Gynecology, Keating and Coe, Dudley. 

Materia Medica — White and Wilcox, P otter, Cushny. 

Therapeutcs — Sollman, Hare, Wood, Forchheimer. 

Diseases of Children — Holt, Eotch, Koplik, Starr's Amer- 
ican Text-Book, Fruehwald and Westcott. 

Medical Jurisprudence — McClellan's Civil Malpractice, 
Wharton and Stille, Beck, Elwell. 

Histology — Huber, Bailey, Stoehr, Piersol, Schafer Stir- 
ling. 

Ophthalmology — Fuchs, Juler, Noyes, Nettleship on the 
Eye. 

Otology and Rhino-Laryngology — Deuch, Bosworth, Kyle, 
Price-Brown, Buck, McBride, American Text-Book. 

Insanity — Compendium of Insanity, Chapin; Mental Dis- 
eases, Berkley; Nervous and Mental Diseases, Church and 
Peterson. 

Dermatology — Stelwagon, Crocker. 

Hygiene — Notter and Firth, Abbott. 

Dietetics — Thompson, Pavy. 

Electro-Therapeutical Practice — Neiswanger, Massey, 
Morrell. 

Text-books and books of reference can be obtained at an 
average cost per volume of from $2.00 to $5.00, or $15.00 to 
$20.00 per year. 



66 THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 

The thorough study of a single text-book in each depart- 
ment is of far greater advantage to the student during his 
college course than the cursory reading of several. It is there- 
fore advised that a single work in each branch be chosen, us- 
ing any of the others for reference. The first one of each of 
the above lists is preferred. 



ALUMNI LIST 

Graduates of this college are requested to acquaint the 
secretary of the faculty immediately of their postoffice ad- 
dresses and to inform him promptly of any change of residence. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



67 



The following is a specimen programme: 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



Hour 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sto 9 


Medica] 

Latin 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Medical 
Latin 


Chemistry 


8:00 to 10:00 


9 to 10 


Physiology 


Physiology 


Histology 


Anatomy 
Recitation 
Sect. Ill 

10:00 to 12:00 

Chemical 

Laboratory 

Sect. I 


Histology 
Recitation 


Laboratory 


10 to 11 


Anatomy 

Recitation 

Sect. I 


Anatomy 


10:10 to 12:00 

Chemical 

Laboratory 

Sect. I 


Physiology 

Recitation 

Section 


10:00 tol2:00 
Histologic'l 
Laboratory 

Sect. II 
10:00 to 12:00 

Chemical 

Laboratory 

Sect. I 




Anatomy 
ist Sent. 

Pharmacy 
2nd Sent. 


11 to 12 


Anatomy 

Recitation 

Sect. II 




lto 2 


1:00 to 3:00 

Physiologi'l 

Laboratory 

Sect. II 

2:00 to 3:00 

Physiology 

Recitation 

Section 


1:00 to 3:00 

Physi'dogi'l 

Laboratory 

Sect I 

1:00 to 3:00 

Chemical 

Laboratory 

Sect. II 


1:00 to 3:00 

Histologic' I 

Laboratory 

Sect. I 


1:00 to 3:00 

Histological 

Laboratory 

Sect. I 


1:00 to 3:00 

Histologic'l 

Laboratory 

Sect. II 

1:00 to 3:00 

Chemical 

Laborat ry 

Sect. I 


1:00 to 3:00 
Anatomical 


2 to 3 


Laboratory 
Optional 


3 to 4 


3:15 to 5:15 

Chemical 

Laboratory 

Sect. II 


3:00 to 5:30 
Anatomical 
Laboratory 


3:00 to 5:30 
Anatomical 
Laboratory 


3:00 to 5:30 
Anatomical 
Laboratory 


3:00 to 5:30 
Anatomical 
Laboratory 




4 to 5 





SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Hour 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8 to 9 


Anatomy 
Recitation 


General 
Pathology 


Materia 
Medica 


Materia 
Medica 


Pathology 
Recitation 




9 to 10 


Anatomy 
Recitation 


Anatomy 


Physiology 


Anatomy 


8:00 to 12:00 
Physiologi'l 
Laboratory 


10 to 11 


Physiology 


10:00 to 12:00 
Physiologi'l 
Laboratory 


Physiologi'l 
Chemistry 

Physiology 


10:00 tol2:00 
Physiologi'l 
Laboratory 


Physiologi'l 
Chemistry 


11 to 12 






lto 2 


1:00 to 3:15 
Physiol, g 7 <r7 

Chemical 
Lab. Sect. I 

1:00 to 3:00 
Pathologic'l 
Lab. Sect. II 
yan. toyune 


1:00 to 3:00 
Physiologi'l 
Laboratory 


1:00 to 3:15 
Physiologi'l 

Chemical 
Lab. Sect. II 

1:00 to 3:00 
Pathologic'l 
Lab. beet. I 
yan. to yune 


1:00 to 3:00 
Physiologi'l 
Laboratory 




1:00 to 3:00 
Anatomical 


2 to 3 




Laboratory 
Optional 


3 to 4 


3:15 to 5:30 
Anatomical 
Laboratory 


3:00 to 5:30 
Anatomical 
Laboratory 


3:15 to 5:30 
Anatomical 
Laboratory 


3:00 to 5:30 
Anatomical 
Laboratory 


3:00 to 5:30 
Anatomical 
Laboratory 




4 to 5 





68 



THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Hour 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8 to 9 


Surgery 


9:00 to 11:00 
Gynecologi- 
cal 
Clinic 


Practice 


Practice 

Recitation 


Practice 


Pathology 


9 to 10 


Practice 


Thera- 
peutics 


Thera- 
peutics 


9:00 to 11:00 

Surg. Tech 

1st Sem 


9:00 to 11:00 


10 to 11 


10:00 to 12:00 

Physical 

Diagnosis 

Section 

10:00 to 12:00 

Pathologic'l 

Laboratory 

Sect. I 


Pathology 


Obstetrics 


10:00 to 11:00 
Surgical 
Anatomy 
2nd Sem 


Medical 
Clinc 


11 to 12 


Gynecol'gy 


Pathology 
Recitation 


Toxicology 


Obstetrics 


Physical 
Diagnosis 


lto 2 




1:00 to 3:00 

Surgical 

Clinic 


1:00 to 3:30 
Pathologist 
Laboratory 

Sect. II 
Until Jan 


1:30 to 3:30 

Medical 

Clin ic 


1:30 to 2:30 

Phys, Diag. 

Section 

1:00 to 3:30 
Pathologic' I 
Laboratory 

Sect I 
Until Jan, 


1:00 to 4:00 
Pathologic^ 


2 to 3 


2:30 to4:00 

Surgical 

Clinic 


Laboratory 
Sect. II 


3 to 4 


3:30 to 4:00 
Gynecol'gy 


3:30 to 5:30 
Pharma- 
cology 


3:00 to 5:30 
Pharma- 
cology 


3:30 to 5:30 
Pharma- 
cology 




4 to 5 


4:00 to 5:00 
Surgery 







SENIOR YEAR 



Hour 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8 to 9 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Practice 


Eye, Ear 

Nose and 

Throat 


Practice 


Eye, Ear 
Nose and 
Throat 


9 to 10 


Practice 


9:00 to 11:00 
Gynecologi- 
cal 
Clinic 


Medical 
Diagnosis 


Practice 

Recitation 


Nervous 
Diseases 


9-00 to 11:00 


10 to 11 


10:00 to'12:00 
Ward Class 
in Surgery 


Paediatrics 
2nd Term 


10:00 to 12:00 
Clinical 

Microscopv 
Sect. 1 

10:00 toll:00 
Medical 

Ward Class 


10:00 to 12:00 
Clinical 

Microscopy 
Sect. II 

10:00 to 11:00 
Medical 

Ward Class 


Medical 
Clinic 


11 to 12 


Gynecol g'y 


Practical 

Obstetrics 




lto 2 


1:00 to 2:30 

Eye Ear 

Nose and 

Throat 

Clinic Sect I 

2:30 to 4:00 

Surgical 

Clinic 


1:00 to 3:00 

Surgical 

Clinic 


1:00 to 2:30 
Dermatol- 
ogy 

2:30 to 4:00 

Eye, Ear 

Nose and 

7 hroat 

Clinic 

Sect. II 


1:30 to 3:30 

Medical 

Clinic 


1:30 to 3:00 

Eye, Ear 

Nose and 

Throat 

Clinic 

Sect. Ill 




2to 3 




3 to 4 


4:00 to 5:00 
Surgery 




3:30 to 5:30 

Operative 

Clin ic 

Eye &? Ear 


3:00 to 5:00 
Eye &* Ear 
Laboratory 




4 to 5 


7:30 to 8:30 

Gynecolog'l 

Diagnosis 


4:30 to 5:30 
Gynecolg'y 
Recitation 


4:00 to 5:00 
Ophthal- 
mology 





THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 



OFFICEKS 

Lee Wallace Dean, M. S v M. D. 
Director 

Perry I. Wessel, M. D. 
Bouse Physician 

William Fred Boiler, M. D. 
Bouse Physician 

Helen Balcom, Graduate Nurse 

Superintendent of the Hospital and Principal of the Nurses ■ 

Training School 

Anna Marie Slater 
Matron 



THE SCHOOL FOR NURSES 



The University conducts in connection with the University 
Hospital and the College of Medicine, a training school for 
nurses designed to provide the best instruction and experience 
for those who desire to enter the profession of nursing. The 
course extends over three years and provides instruction and ex 
perience in handling all kinds of cases. The instruction is 
given by the regular professors and lecturers of the College of 
Medicine and the principal of the training school, together 
with some special lectures by outside authorities on topics of 
interest and importance to nurses. An information bureau is 
conducted in connection with the school for the benefit of the 
nurses graduated. Persons desiring to enter the training school 
will do well to make application some months before they are 
read to enter upon their duty, as it may be some time before 
a vacancy occurs. 

Courses of lectures are given each year by the members of 
the medical faculty as follows: 

Ethics in Nursing and Gynecology — Professor Guthrie. 

General Surgery and Anesthesia — Professor Jepson. 

Obstetrics — Professor Whiteis. 

Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases — Professor 
Bierring. 

Anatomy — Professor Prentiss. 

Physiology — Professor McClintock. 

Diseases of the Skin — Dr. Kessler. 

Materia Medica — Professor Chase. 

Food Dietetics — Professor Rockwood. 

Bacteriology — Professor Albert. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat — Professor Dean, Dr. Bailey. 

Diseases of Children, Urinalysis — Assistant Professor Van 
Epps. 

Bandaging, Fractures, Dislocations, etc. — Assistant Pro- 
fessor Burge. 



INDKX 



Administrative Officers, . . 8, 17 
Admission, Requirements for, 28 
Advanced Standing, . 29 
Combined Courses, . . 32 
Examinations for, . .28 
Increased Requirements, 32 

Alumni List 66 

Athletics 15 

Board of Regents, 7 

Buildings : 

Hall of Anatomy, . . 22 

Hospital 22 

Medical Laboratories, . 22 

University, .... 10 

Calendar for 1907-8, ... 2 

University, The, ... 3 

Clinical Patients 23 

Clinics 23 

Courses of Instruction : 

Anatomy, 34 

Bacteriology, . . . .48 
Chemistry, . . . . 40 

Dentistry, 63 

Dermatology, . . . .63 
Embryology, . . . .43 

Gynecology 58 

Histology, 43 

Latin 47 

Materia Medica, . . .45 
Medical Jurisprudence, . 64 
Obstetrics, . . . . 58 
Ophthalmology, etc., 59 

Pathology, 48 

Physiology 37 

Surgery 56 

Theory and Practice, . 53 



Therapeutics, . . .45 

Toxicology, .... 40 

Course, Length of 21 

Dean of Women, .... 15 
Degrees : 

Bachelor of Science, . 33 
Doctor of Medicine, . 31 
Master of Science, . .31 
Examination for Admission, 28 
Removal of Deficiencies, 30 
Expenses, Estimate of, . . 25 

Faculty 17 

History of College of Medicine, 21 

Hospitals 15, 22, 69 

Laboratories, . . . . 13, 22 
Lectures, Public, . . . .14 

Libraries 12 

Museum, Pathological, . . 23 
Natural History Collections, 13 
Nurses, The School for, . 70 
Officers of Instruction, . . 17 
Organization, ... 6, 10, 21 
Pathological Museum, . . 23 
Physical Training, . . . .15 
Physicians, Resident, . . 23 
Program of Studies, ... 67 
Publications, University, . 13 
Regents, Board of, . . . 7 
Religious Influences, ... 14 
School for Nurses, The, . . 70 

Self Support 15 

Societies, Scientific, etc., . . 13 

Text-Books, 64 

Tuition, 24 

Unclassified Students, . . . 30 



3 0112 105745589 



The special announcement of any College or School of the 
University, giving full information in regard to entrance re- 
quirements, expenses, courses of study, etc., is supplied, free of 
charge, to any one who desires it. 

Address: President George E. MacLean, 

Iowa City, Iowa.